Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have data arranged like this in R:

indv    time    val
A          6    5
A         10    10
A         12    7
B          8    4
B         10    3
B         15    9

For each individual (indv) at each time, I want to calculate the change in value (val) from the initial time. So I would end up with something like this:

indv time   val val_1   val_change
A       6     5    5       0
A      10    10    5       5
A      12     7    5       2
B       8     4    4       0
B      10     3    4      -1
B      15     9    4       5

Can anyone tell me how I might do this? I can use

ddply(df, .(indv), function(x)x[which.min(x$time), ])

to get a table like

indv    time    val
A          6    5   
B          8    4   

However, I cannot figure out how to make a column val_1 where the minimum values are matched up for each individual. However, if I can do that, I should be able to add column val_change using something like:

df['val_change'] = df['val_1'] - df['val']

EDIT: two excellent methods were posted below, however both rely on my time column being sorted so that small time values are on top of high time values. I'm not sure this will always be the case with my data. (I know I can sort first in Excel, but I'm trying to avoid that.) How could I deal with a case when the table appears like this:

indv    time    value
A          10   10
A           6   5
A          12   7
B           8   4
B          10   3
B          15   9
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a plyr solution using ddply

ddply(df, .(indv), transform, 
      val_1 = val[1],
      change = (val - val[1]))

  indv time val val_1 change
1    A    6   5     5      0
2    A   10  10     5      5
3    A   12   7     5      2
4    B    8   4     4      0
5    B   10   3     4     -1
6    B   15   9     4      5

To get your second table try this:

ddply(df, .(indv), function(x) x[which.min(x$time), ])
  indv time val
1    A    6   5
2    B    8   4

Edit 1

To deal with unsorted data, like the one you posted in your edit try the following

unsort <- read.table(text="indv    time    value
A          10   10
A           6   5
A          12   7
B           8   4
B          10   3
B          15   9", header=T)


do.call(rbind, lapply(split(unsort, unsort$indv), 
                  function(x) x[order(x$time), ]))
    indv time value
A.2    A    6     5
A.1    A   10    10
A.3    A   12     7
B.4    B    8     4
B.5    B   10     3
B.6    B   15     9

Now you can apply the procedure described above to this sorted dataframe

Edit 2

A shorter way to sort your dataframe is using sortBy function from doBy package

library(doBy)
orderBy(~ indv + time, unsort)
  indv time value
2    A    6     5
1    A   10    10
3    A   12     7
4    B    8     4
5    B   10     3
6    B   15     9

Edit 3

You can even sort your df using ddply

ddply(unsort, .(indv, time), sort)
  value time indv
1     5    6    A
2    10   10    A
3     7   12    A
4     4    8    B
5     3   10    B
6     9   15    B
share|improve this answer
    
Dear Jilber, thanks so much for your help! However, this would only work if the "time" column has values sorted from low to high. I'm not sure if this is always the case in my data, although I could sort it first in Excel (which i'm trying to avoid using however). Would there be a method when the values are not sorted, like in the following table: indv time value A 10 10 A 6 5 A 12 7 B 8 4 B 10 3 B 15 9 –  Thomas Nov 14 '12 at 21:21
    
Yes, See my edit. Hope you find it useful –  Jilber Nov 14 '12 at 21:29
    
Dear Jilber, your edit seems to work great, thank you so much! I had been trying all day to figure this out! Now I will try it with my real data, thanks again for your help!!! –  Thomas Nov 14 '12 at 21:38
    
Glad to be useful. See my second edit for a shorter way to sort your data.frame. –  Jilber Nov 14 '12 at 21:41

Here is a data.table solution that will be memory efficient as it is setting by reference within the data.table. Setting the key will sort by the key variables

library(data.table)
DT <- data.table(df)  
# set key to sort by indv then time
setkey(DT, indv, time)
DT[, c('val1','change') := list(val[1], val - val[1]),by = indv]
# And to show it works....
DT
##    indv time val val1 change
## 1:    A    6   5    5      0
## 2:    A   10  10    5      5
## 3:    A   12   7    5      2
## 4:    B    8   4    4      0
## 5:    B   10   3    4     -1
## 6:    B   15   9    4      5
share|improve this answer

You can do this with the base functions. using your data

df <- read.table(text = "indv    time    val
A   6   5
A   10  10
A   12  7
B   8   4
B   10  3
B   15  9", header = TRUE)

We first split() df on the indv variable

sdf <- split(df, df$indv)

Next we transform each component of sdf adding in the val_1 and val_change variables in a manner similar to how you suggest

sdf <- lapply(sdf, function(x) transform(x, val_1 = val[1],
                                         val_change = val - val[1]))

Finally we arrange for the individual components to be bound row wise into a single data frame:

df <- do.call(rbind, sdf)
df

Which gives:

R> df
    indv time val val_1 val_change
A.1    A    6   5     5          0
A.2    A   10  10     5          5
A.3    A   12   7     5          2
B.4    B    8   4     4          0
B.5    B   10   3     4         -1
B.6    B   15   9     4          5

Edit

To address the sorting issue the OP raises in the comments, modify the lapply() call to include a sorting step prior to the transform(). For example:

sdf <- lapply(sdf, function(x) {
                     x <- x[order(x$time), ]
                     transform(x, val_1 = val[1],
                               val_change = val - val[1])
                   })

In use we have

## scramble `df`
df <- df[sample(nrow(df)), ]
## split
sdf <- split(df, df$indv)
## apply sort and transform
sdf <- lapply(sdf, function(x) {
                     x <- x[order(x$time), ]
                     transform(x, val_1 = val[1],
                               val_change = val - val[1])
                   })
## combine
df <- do.call(rbind, sdf)

which again gives:

R> df
    indv time val val_1 val_change
A.1    A    6   5     5          0
A.2    A   10  10     5          5
A.3    A   12   7     5          2
B.4    B    8   4     4          0
B.5    B   10   3     4         -1
B.6    B   15   9     4          5
share|improve this answer
    
Dear Gavin, thanks for your help! That method indeed works for my data, however only when the the time column is sorted so that the first values appear before the later values. I'm not sure my data will always be sorted in that way. Is there a similar method for when the times are out of order, like in the following table: indv time value A 10 10 A 6 5 A 12 7 B 8 4 B 10 3 B 15 9 –  Thomas Nov 14 '12 at 21:26
    
Then sort val first or sort by time whichever it is that you want. It is much easier to sort the data frame first that to worry about handling it in the differencing operation. –  Gavin Simpson Nov 14 '12 at 21:31
1  
I have suggested a solution to that. In future, it helps to formulate the question fully to avoid extended updating of answers etc. Hopefully the edit I made to my question helps? –  Gavin Simpson Nov 14 '12 at 21:37
    
Dear Gavin, thanks. Yes, the edit helps. I'm sorry I didn't formulate the question fully, I didn't realize I had mis-formulated it until I read the answers. I will try to be more careful next time! –  Thomas Nov 14 '12 at 21:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.