Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a ISceneNode interface and from that a SceneNode base class. From the SceneNode class derive MeshNode, AnimNode, LightNode, CameraNode, ect...

Now I have an actor class that through a method takes in a shared_ptr and stores it in a field.

What I'd like to be able to do is send in any std::shared_ptr or other derived classes into the function that takes in a shared_ptr .

With bare pointers this would be an implicit conversion.

The solution that I came up with was to write a overload for each of the derives and then cast it within the method using dynamic_pointer_cast . That's just nasty there should be a better way.

Is there a way to get implicit casting, or a better way I don't know of to handle this? What's the proper way to handle this?

void SomeFunc()
{
    std::shared_ptr<MeshNode> pMeshNode( new MeshNode() );
    gActor.SetNode( pMeshNode );  // won't compile.

    // or do i have to do it like this
    gActor.SetNode( std::dynamic_pointer_cast<ISceneNode> (pMeshNode) );
}

void Actor::SetNode( std::shared_ptr<ISceneNode> pNode )
{
    mpNode = pNode;
}

// or do I have to do it like this?  Making an over load for each derived.
void Actor::SetNode( std::shared_ptr<MeshNode> pMeshNode )
{
    mpNode = std::dynamic_pointer_cast<ISceneNode> (pMeshNode);
}
share|improve this question
1  
std::shared_ptr<ISceneNode> pMeshNode( new MeshNode() ); works. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 14 '12 at 21:20
1  
Minor point: there's no such thing as an "implicit cast". There is explicit type conversion (called a "cast") and implicit type conversion. –  user529758 Nov 14 '12 at 21:21
    
@R. Martinho Fernandes The SceneNode objects are being created by another class and handed over to the Actor class. This isn't shown in the example in order to fit within the question format. –  EddieV223 Nov 14 '12 at 21:25

2 Answers 2

You claim it won't compile, but the following test compiles and runs for me (VS2012, Clang, G++). You should post the error you're getting, as it's most likely something else.

#include <memory>

struct IBase {};

struct Derived : IBase {};

void Foo(std::shared_ptr<IBase> p) {}

int main()
{
    std::shared_ptr<Derived> d;
    Foo(d);
}
share|improve this answer

I bet you are using VS2010? I found some problems with smart pointers support there? On a compiler with better C++11 support (eg. VS2012, gcc, clang) it should compile fine. However I would suggest you some extensions:

class Actor {
  std::shared_ptr<ISceneNode> mpNode;
public:
  void SetNode(std::shared_ptr<ISceneNode> pNode)
  { mpNode = std::move(pNode); }
};

void SomeFunc()
{
  gActor.SetNode(std::make_shared<MeshNode>());
}

It is always better to allocate std::shared_ptr with std::make_shared<T>() which saves you one dynamic allocation and even up to the half of shared state memory overhead. You should also either pass std::shared_ptr as a reference to a function or at least move it to a new value like I did. You could also consider using std::unique_ptr which makes it even more effective (no shared state memory overhead and thread safe reference counting) and makes the design better (clear ownership). You can use in a very similar way:

class Actor {
  std::unique_ptr<ISceneNode> mpNode;
public:
  void SetNode(std::unique_ptr<ISceneNode> pNode)
  { mpNode = std::move(pNode); }
};

void SomeFunc()
{
  gActor.SetNode(std::unique_ptr<MeshNode>(new MeshNode));
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.