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Spring has the ability to return a subset of a collection through the ExpressionParser (Collection Selection).

For example, imagine a simple class:

public Customer {
  private String name;
  private boolean vip;
  private boolean conferenceAttendee;
}

If I had a List<Customer> collection that was previously set as a StandardEvaluationContext variable: evalContext.setVariable("customerList", customers); I could retrieve a subset of all the customers where vip is true through a "selection expression" <variable>.?[<selectionExpression>]:

List<Customer> vipCustomers = 
       (List<Customer>)new SpelExpressionParser()
            .parseExpression("#customerList.?[vip]")
            .getValue(evalContext);

Is it possible to execute this same logic in a selection expression as a union (vip || conferenceAttendee) or intersection (vip && conferenceAttendee), without having to call evalContext.setVariable("customerList", vipCustomers) on an intermediate list and perform a second parseExpression?

Something similar to this:

// This doesn't work...
List<Customer> vipCustomers = 
       (List<Customer>)new SpelExpressionParser()
            .parseExpression("#customerList.?[vip || conferenceAttendee]")
            .getValue(evalContext);

I'm looking specifically to understand what valid selection expressions I can pass in to SpelExpressionParser's parseExpression, as opposed to other comparable solutions.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are very very close. There is the OR and AND logical operators in the Spring Expression Language that you can use:

    customerList.add(new Customer("jim", true, false));
    customerList.add(new Customer("bob", false, true));
    customerList.add(new Customer("rob", true, true));

    List<Customer> vipCustomers =
            (List<Customer>)new SpelExpressionParser()
                    .parseExpression("#customerList.?[vip]")
                    .getValue(evalContext);
    System.out.println(vipCustomers);
    //[Customer{name='jim'}, Customer{name='rob'}]

    List<Customer> vipANDConfAttendeesCustomers =
            (List<Customer>)new SpelExpressionParser()
                    .parseExpression("#customerList.?[vip and conferenceAttendee]")
                    .getValue(evalContext);
    System.out.println(vipANDConfAttendeesCustomers);
    //[Customer{name='rob'}]        

    List<Customer> vipORConfAttendeesCustomers =
            (List<Customer>)new SpelExpressionParser()
                    .parseExpression("#customerList.?[vip or conferenceAttendee]")
                    .getValue(evalContext);
    System.out.println(vipORConfAttendeesCustomers);
    //[Customer{name='jim'}, Customer{name='bob'}, Customer{name='rob'}]        

Before Edit - Can be ignored as not really an answer but a suggestion

Allow me to introduce another approach to that without Spring that has a more functional feel into it and scales nicely providing more expressiveness for complex and/or interactions. The following solution is using Guava's Predicates to express the main building blocks of your querying needs:

    Predicate<Customer> isVip = new Predicate<Customer>() {
        @Override
        public boolean apply(Customer customer) {
            return customer.isVip();
        }
    };

    Predicate<Customer> isConferenceAttendee = new Predicate<Customer>() {
        @Override
        public boolean apply(Customer customer) {
            return customer.isConferenceAttendee();
        }
    };

and then combine them into more complex queries involving Predicates.and and Predicates.or, filtering the Collection through Iterables.filter (a functional way of iterating through them):

Iterables.filter(customers, isVip);
Iterables.filter(customers, Predicates.and(isVip,isConferenceAttendee));
Iterables.filter(customers, Predicates.or(isVip,isConferenceAttendee));

The full working example with some autogenerated equals/hashcode/toString methods based on the assumption that the name is what identifies uniquely a Customer:

import com.google.common.base.Predicate;
import com.google.common.base.Predicates;
import com.google.common.collect.Iterables;
import com.google.common.collect.Lists;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class GuavaTest {

    public static void main(String ...args){

        Predicate<Customer> isVip = new Predicate<Customer>() {
            @Override
            public boolean apply(Customer customer) {
                return customer.isVip();
            }
        };

        Predicate<Customer> isConferenceAttendee = new Predicate<Customer>() {
            @Override
            public boolean apply(Customer customer) {
                return customer.isConferenceAttendee();
            }
        };

        List<Customer> customers = Lists.newArrayList();

        customers.add(new Customer("jim",true,false));
        customers.add(new Customer("bob",false,true));
        customers.add(new Customer("rob",true,true));

        System.out.println("Vips:\t"+Iterables.filter(customers, isVip));
        System.out.println("Vips && ConfAttendees:\t"+Iterables.filter(customers, Predicates.and(isVip,isConferenceAttendee)));
        System.out.print("Vips || ConfAttendees:\t"+Iterables.filter(customers, Predicates.or(isVip,isConferenceAttendee)));
    }
}

class Customer {
 private String name;
 private boolean vip;
 private boolean conferenceAttendee;

    Customer(String name, boolean vip, boolean conferenceAttendee) {
        this.name = name;
        this.vip = vip;
        this.conferenceAttendee = conferenceAttendee;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public boolean isVip() {
        return vip;
    }

    public boolean isConferenceAttendee() {
        return conferenceAttendee;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if (this == o) return true;
        if (o == null || getClass() != o.getClass()) return false;

        Customer customer = (Customer) o;

        if (name != null ? !name.equals(customer.name) : customer.name != null) return false;

        return true;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return name != null ? name.hashCode() : 0;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Customer{" +
                "name='" + name + '\'' +
                '}';
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the response, though for this particular situation, I really do need to know the functional limitations of SpelExpressionParser's parseExpression. –  J Shapiro Nov 15 '12 at 0:28
    
you are right. Let me edit my response –  dimitrisli Nov 15 '12 at 10:33
    
Thanks for the thorough answer! –  J Shapiro Nov 15 '12 at 12:06

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