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Let's say I have the following array of hashes:

h = [{"name" => "bob"}, {"car" => "toyota"}, {"age" => "25"}]

And I have the following key to match:

k = 'car'

How do I match the 'k' to 'h' and have delete every element after the match so that it returns:

h = [{"name" => "bob"}, {"car" => "toyota"}]
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Define "before". Do you mean alphabetically, or in the order the hash is using? –  the Tin Man Nov 14 '12 at 22:26
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I like megas' version, as its short and to the point. Another approach, which would be more explicit, would be iterating over the keys array of each hash. The keys of a hash are maintained in an ordered array (http://ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Hash.html). They are ordered by when they were first entered. As a result, you can try the following:

newArray = Array.new
h.each do |hash| # Iterate through your array of hashes
    newArray << hash
    if hash.has_key?("car") # check if this hash is the "car" hash.
      break # exits the block
    end
end

This all depends, of course, on whether the array was created in the proper order. If it was, then you're golden.

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Sorry, I wrote the array of hashes wrong before. Please see my edited version above. –  oprogfrogo Nov 14 '12 at 22:14
    
@oprogfrogo Hah. Quite a difference. See my edited answer. Does that make more sense? –  Paul Richter Nov 14 '12 at 22:20
    
Awesome Thanks. –  oprogfrogo Nov 14 '12 at 22:24
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A hash is unordered set by definition, so what you request is somewhat undefined. However you can do something like a hack:

h = {"name" => "bob", "car" => "toyota", "age" => "25"}
matched = false
key_given = "car"
h.each do |k,v|
  if matched 
    h.delete(k)
  end

  if k == key_given
    matched = true
    next
  end
end
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Sorry, I wrote the array of hashes wrong before. Please see my edited version above. –  oprogfrogo Nov 14 '12 at 22:15
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Just convert hash to array, do your task and then convert back

h = {"name" => "bob", "car" => "toyota", "age" => "25"}

array = h.to_a.flatten
index = array.index('car') + 1

h = Hash[*array[0..index]]
=> {"name"=>"bob", "car"=>"toyota"}

By the way, the hash is ordered only since Ruby 1.9

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Sorry, I wrote the array of hashes wrong before. Please see my edited version above. –  oprogfrogo Nov 14 '12 at 22:15
1  
Hashes aren't ordered as some people think. They're maintained in their insertion order, but not ordered alphabetically. –  the Tin Man Nov 14 '12 at 22:26
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ar = [{"name" => "bob"}, {"car" => "toyota"}, {"age" => "25"}]
p ar[0 .. ar.index{|h| h.key?('car')}] #=>[{"name"=>"bob"}, {"car"=>"toyota"}]
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