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I want the following function: taking the following parameters:

  • def filters: Map[String, String]
  • def queryString: Map[String, Seq[String]] (from request.queryString)
  • def key: String

.. if queryString contains the key specified in parameter, I want to add the corresponding value to filters.

A working function is:

private def getUpdatedFiltersIfQueryStringContains(filters: Map[String, String], queryString: Map[String, Seq[String]], key: String): Map[String, String] = {
  var updatedFilters: Map[String, String] = filters

  if (queryString.contains(key)) {
    updatedFilters = updatedFilters ++ Map(key -> queryString.get(key).get.head)
  }

  updatedFilters
}

This looks horrendous, right?

Since if statements return stuff in Scala, I was expecting something more along those lines:

private def getUpdatedFiltersIfQueryStringContains(filters: Map[String, String], queryString: Map[String, Seq[String]], key: String): Map[String, String] = {
  if (queryString.contains(key)) {
    filters ++ Map(key -> queryString.get(key).get.head)
  }
}

But this doesn't compile, the error is:

type mismatch; found : Unit required: Map[String,String]

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Scala does not a an if-statement - it has an if-expression. As you already said, they return a value - a statement is the name for an instruction that doesn't return anything. –  sschaef Nov 14 '12 at 23:46
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your function signature states that Map[String, String] should be returned, but ... hold on a second and imagine, what if queryString doesn't contain a key? Well, looks like nothing will be returned, and Unit is nothing in Scala (at least one of the nothing kinds).

To fix that problem you need to provide alternative:

private def getUpdatedFiltersIfQueryStringContains(filters: Map[String, String], queryString: Map[String, Seq[String]], key: String): Map[String, String] = {
    if (queryString.contains(key)) {
      filters ++ Map(key -> queryString.get(key).get.head)
    } else filters
  }

by the way, function name really scares me

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Exactly what I wanted. Samuel's solution is a one liner, but looks also a bit more obscure to a newbie. –  Blackbird Nov 14 '12 at 22:11
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You can use the more monadic

queryString.get(key) map { v => filters ++ Map(key -> v.head) } getOrElse filters

which does what you want.

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Here is a more idiomatic implementation that doesn't use if:

def getUpdatedFiltersIfQueryStringContains(filters: Map[String, String], queryString: Map[String, Seq[String]], key: String): Map[String, String] =
  filters ++ queryString.get(key).map(key -> _.head)
share|improve this answer
    
Aren't you lacking a Map here? You can't ++ a pair to a map, can you? –  Samuel Tardieu Nov 14 '12 at 23:53
    
Map[K,V].get(key) returns an Option[V], which is basically just a collection limited to size 0 or 1. You can use ++ on it and map across it just like other collections. Scala 2.10 even added fold operations to Option. –  DaoWen Nov 15 '12 at 0:04
    
There is an implicit conversion from Option[A] to Iterable[A], and ++ allows you to append an Iterable[(A, B)] to a Map[A, B]. –  Ben James Nov 15 '12 at 8:26
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