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In Ruby on rails according to Hardl you can write a password confirmation according to something like that below, however I cant get the last test in the series to work with:

#IS THIS A VALID TEST?
  describe "when password confirmation is not present" do
    before { @user.Password_confirmation = nil }
    it { should_not be_valid }
  end

So my question is does this do the job, i changed nil in the last part to " ", blankspace, is this the same thing as when testing against nil?:

describe User do
  before { @user = User.new(Address:"Dummy Address",Email: "user@example.com", FirstName:"Jim", LastName:"Beam", Password:"ABC123", Password_confirmation:"ABC123", Phone:"+46000", Username:"ExampleUser", Zip:"22646" ) }

  subject { @user }
  puts "TEST"

  it { should respond_to(:FirstName) }
  it { should respond_to(:LastName) }
  it { should respond_to(:Email) }
  it { should respond_to(:password_digest) }
  it { should respond_to(:Password) }
  it { should respond_to(:Password_confirmation) }
  it { should be_valid }




  describe "when password is not present" do
    before { @user.Password = @user.Password_confirmation = " " }
    it { should_not be_valid }
  end

  describe "when password doesn't match confirmation" do
    before { @user.Password_confirmation = "mismatch" }
    it { should_not be_valid }
  end

  #IS THIS A VALID TEST?
  describe "when password confirmation is not present" do
    before { @user.Password_confirmation = " " }
    it { should_not be_valid }
  end
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Even "".nil? returns false. If you need to test for blankness just use method blank? provided by ActveSupport.

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