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My TL asked me to implement this:

If we have the alphabets in english numbered as

a   1
b   2
c   3
d   4
e   5
f   6
g   7
h   8
i   9
j   1
k   2
l   3
m   4
n   5
o   6
p   7
q   8
r   9
s   1
t   2
u   3
v   4
w   5
x   6
y   7
z   8

the vowels would be

a   1
e   5
i   9
o   6
u   3

The User would enter :

  1. Number of Vowels
  2. Sum
  3. Number of Characters

Now I need to display a string of length : number of Characters entered by user.
The String would have two Parts:
The first Part would have the Vowels with sum entered by the user.
The second part would be of length [Number of Chars entered by user - Vowels as per the first half of string above] and the sum would be the same entered by user.

Can any body write C# code for this. I tried real hard but could not figure it out.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Here's my code so far:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace VowelsAndConsonants
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            //Gather Info from the User
            Console.WriteLine("Please Enter Number of Vowels");
            string numVowels = Console.ReadLine();
            Console.WriteLine("Please Enter the Total");
            string total = Console.ReadLine();
            Console.WriteLine("Please Enter the Number of Chars");
            string numChars = Console.ReadLine();
            //Convert the Strings entered by User to int
            int inNumVowels = Convert.ToInt16(numVowels);
            int intTotal = Convert.ToInt16(total);
            int intNumChars = Convert.ToInt16(numChars);
            //Populate the Array with all the alphanets
            string[,] arr = new string[,] { { "a", "1" }, { "b", "2" }, { "c", "3" }, { "d", "4" }, { "e", "5" }, { "f", "6" }, { "g", "7" }, { "h", "8" }, { "i", "9" }, { "j", "1" }, { "k", "2" }, { "l", "3" }, { "m", "4" }, { "n", "5" }, { "o", "6" }, { "p", "7" }, { "q", "8" }, { "r", "9" }, { "s", "1" }, { "t", "2" }, { "u", "3" }, { "v", "4" }, { "w", "5" }, { "x", "6" }, { "y", "7" }, { "z", "8" } };
            string[] resArr= new string[20];// = null;
            for (int i = 0; i < intNumChars; i++)
            {
                //The logic you guys would suggest goes here
                resArr[0]=arr[,];
                //Display the string
                Console.WriteLine("");
            }
        }
    }
}
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3  
You say you tried real hard, what did you try? What, exactly, are you stuck on? –  Noon Silk Aug 27 '09 at 4:38
    
Show us exactly how you tried. we will be glad to help! This is a little differen homework question. I can see you had written this question well. Now show us what you did so far ;-) –  Shoban Aug 27 '09 at 4:40
    
I tried this way: I tried to take the mod of the numbers and tried to catch the alphabets corresponding to the total. Say user enters 2 as vowels 11 as sum and 5 as number of Chars. then the answer would be Vowels: 11%2 that would give 5, the other would be 11-(11%2) giving 6 so vowels would be e and o, similarly for the consonants. However this logic is not working for others say user enters 3 for vowels, 12 for Consonants, and number of chars as 5. I tried many different ways. this was the best logic I could get on top of my head. But to implement this in C# !!!! I couldn't. PL help –  Pradeep007 Aug 27 '09 at 4:44
1  
Please post your code. We are not going to write it for you. –  ChaosPandion Aug 27 '09 at 4:45
2  
I think you misunderstand mod. 11 % 2 is 1. –  recursive Aug 27 '09 at 5:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The hard part isn't writing the code. The hard part is figuring out what the algorithm is that solves this problem. Once you have the algorithm solid, turning it into code will be straightforward.

What are your thoughts on the algorithm? Start with some contrived examples. For instance, suppose you are given 1/9/2. A solution to that is IR. How would you, as a human, come up with that solution? Can you describe a method whereby you, a human, could always come up with the answer?

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I think that you are on the wrong track with using mod.

It seems to me that this is a variation to a "greedy algorithm" problem, normaly associated with working out efficient change with coins in homework questions, but I think this seems to be a variant of it.

Wikipedia has a page on it, and I am sure googling greedy algorithm will help you out.

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