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I have two classes foo and bar where one is a superclass of the other, and they both have a method hello_world.

class foo {
    virtual void hello_world();
};
class bar : public foo {
    void hello_world();
};

My question is: is there any performance difference if I make it virtual for bar's hello_world? It will become this:

class foo {
    virtual void hello_world();
};
class bar : public foo {
    virtual void hello_world();
};

I will mainly call hello_world from bar. I know virtual function will make functions slow because we do run time look up. But for this case, is there any difference?

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3  
It's hard to know exactly what you're asking since your example code isn't syntactically valid. But if you're asking whether adding the virtual keyword to a function that's already virtual (because it's inherited as a virtual function) changes performance, then the answer is no - the virtual keyword has no effect in that case at all. –  Michael Burr Nov 14 '12 at 23:12
    
You can actually measure this if you set up a reasonable test. I remember doing exactly that a few years back, and found that the overhead wasn't worth worrying about. Maybe it is worth worrying about for your application, but I doubt it. –  paddy Nov 14 '12 at 23:37
1  
This question should not have been closed. It is specific, answerable and on-topic here. –  John Dibling Nov 15 '12 at 11:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Calling a virtual function in a context where the class may, indeed, be polymorphic always has some performance impact compared to a function with the same logic that can be inlined. The primary reasons are that there is a small overhead calling a function, a small overhead in looking up which function needs to be called, and a major loss of optimization opportunities. The last point is typically the most expensive one.

The original example didn't compile, i.e., it is pretty clear that no performance analysis was done, yet. Worry about the performance impact once you have measured that your code runs too slow and that the specific call is, indeed, in the area where the performance problem comes from.

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The hello_word() members in his code are both private virtual regardless if he uses virtual keyword on bar::hello_word() or not. –  Öö Tiib Nov 14 '12 at 23:16
    
To my reading, this overplays (a bit) the performance hit taken by virtual functions on most real world applications, let alone toy applications. –  John Dibling Nov 15 '12 at 0:30
    
Öö Tiib: Yes, the whether the functions are private doesn't matter: If a derived class has a function matching the signature of a virtual function of a base class, it overrides the function. –  Dietmar Kühl Nov 15 '12 at 0:40
1  
@JohnDibling: I didn't claim that there is a big overhead. Depending on what is done in the function it may or may not matter. However, if tiny virtual functions called in inner loops this can be a problem. For example, calling an increment(), an at_end(), and a get_value() virtual functions when iterating over a vector-like data structure can have a major performance impact. Making a function formatting a couple of numbers virtual or not will probably not have a measurable impact. –  Dietmar Kühl Nov 15 '12 at 0:44
    
Oh, I just give an example here. In my application the hello_world is performance critical... –  WhatABeautifulWorld Nov 15 '12 at 1:32

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