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I have a series with a MultiIndex like this:

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

buckets = np.repeat(['a','b','c'], [3,5,1])
sequence = [0,1,5,0,1,2,4,50,0]

s = pd.Series(
    np.random.randn(len(sequence)), 
    index=pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(zip(buckets, sequence))
)

# In [6]: s
# Out[6]: 
# a  0    -1.106047
#    1     1.665214
#    5     0.279190
# b  0     0.326364
#    1     0.900439
#    2    -0.653940
#    4     0.082270
#    50   -0.255482
# c  0    -0.091730

I'd like to get the s['b'] values where the second index ('sequence') is between 2 and 10.

Slicing on the first index works fine:

s['a':'b']
# Out[109]: 
# bucket  value
# a       0        1.828176
#         1        0.160496
#         5        0.401985
# b       0       -1.514268
#         1       -0.973915
#         2        1.285553
#         4       -0.194625
#         5       -0.144112

But not on the second, at least by what seems to be the two most obvious ways:

1) This returns elements 1 through 4, with nothing to do with the index values

s['b'][1:10]

# In [61]: s['b'][1:10]
# Out[61]: 
# 1     0.900439
# 2    -0.653940
# 4     0.082270
# 50   -0.255482

However, if I reverse the index and the first index is integer and the second index is a string, it works:

In [26]: s
Out[26]: 
0   a   -0.126299
1   a    1.810928
5   a    0.571873
0   b   -0.116108
1   b   -0.712184
2   b   -1.771264
4   b    0.148961
50  b    0.089683
0   c   -0.582578

In [25]: s[0]['a':'b']
Out[25]: 
a   -0.126299
b   -0.116108
share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

As Robbie-Clarken answers, since 0.14 you can pass a slice in the tuple you pass to loc:

In [11]: s.loc[('b', slice(2, 10))]
Out[11]:
b  2   -0.65394
   4    0.08227
dtype: float64

Indeed, you can pass a slice for each level:

In [12]: s.loc[(slice('a', 'b'), slice(2, 10))]
Out[12]:
a  5    0.27919
b  2   -0.65394
   4    0.08227
dtype: float64

Note: the slice is inclusive.


Old answer:

You can also do this using:

s.ix[1:10, "b"]

(It's good practice to do in a single ix/loc/iloc since this version allows assignment.)

This answer was written prior to the introduction of iloc in early 2013, i.e. position/integer location - which may be preferred in this case. The reason it was created was to remove the ambiguity from integer-indexed pandas objects, and be more descriptive: "I'm slicing on position".

s["b"].iloc[1:10]

That said, I kinda disagree with the docs that ix is:

most robust and consistent way

it's not, the most consistent way is to describe what you're doing:

  • use loc for labels
  • use iloc for position
  • use ix for both (if you really have to)

Remember the zen of python:

explicit is better than implicit

share|improve this answer
    
It feels like there ought to be a way to do this in one pass (using loc / without chaining), however assignment (s['b'].ix[1:10]) works so I guess it's ok. – Andy Hayden Jan 16 '14 at 18:15
    
Please @Andy-Hayden update you answer to comply with the new pandas API. as Robbie-Clarken shows: loc and slice indexing are recommended. – mithrado Jan 27 at 19:19
    
@mithrado thanks for pointing that out, i have been meaning to go through all my pandas answers and update them. I need to write a script as there's too many to do manually. :/ – Andy Hayden Jan 28 at 0:13

The best way I can think of is to use 'select' in this case. Although it even says in the docs that "This method should be used only when there is no more direct way."

Indexing and selecting data

In [116]: s
Out[116]: 
a  0     1.724372
   1     0.305923
   5     1.780811
b  0    -0.556650
   1     0.207783
   4    -0.177901
   50    0.289365
   0     1.168115

In [117]: s.select(lambda x: x[0] == 'b' and 2 <= x[1] <= 10)
Out[117]: b  4   -0.177901
share|improve this answer
    
Surprisingly (for me at least), although comparable for small Series, this starts to become slower than using ix when the Series is longer than 250. (Tested using %timeit in ipython.) – Andy Hayden Nov 15 '12 at 9:43

As of pandas 0.14.0 it is possible to slice multi-indexed objects by providing .loc a tuple containing slice objects:

In [2]: s.loc[('b', slice(2, 10))]
Out[2]:
b  2   -1.206052
   4   -0.735682
dtype: float64
share|improve this answer

not sure if this is ideal but it works by creating a mask

In [59]: s.index
Out[59]: 
MultiIndex
[('a', 0) ('a', 1) ('a', 5) ('b', 0) ('b', 1) ('b', 2) ('b', 4)
 ('b', 50) ('c', 0)]
In [77]: s[(tpl for tpl in s.index if 2<=tpl[1]<=10 and tpl[0]=='b')]                                                               
Out[77]: 
b  2   -0.586568
   4    1.559988

EDIT : hayden's solution is the way to go

share|improve this answer
    
you can use 2 <= tpl[1] <= 10 rather than 2<= and <=10. – Andy Hayden Nov 15 '12 at 0:22
    
thanks. edited the post. – locojay Nov 15 '12 at 0:27

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