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I have a series with a MultiIndex like this:

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

buckets = np.repeat(['a','b','c'], [3,5,1])
sequence = [0,1,5,0,1,2,4,50,0]

s = pd.Series(
    np.random.randn(len(sequence)), 
    index=pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(zip(buckets, sequence))
)

# In [6]: s
# Out[6]: 
# a  0    -1.106047
#    1     1.665214
#    5     0.279190
# b  0     0.326364
#    1     0.900439
#    2    -0.653940
#    4     0.082270
#    50   -0.255482
# c  0    -0.091730

I'd like to get the s['b'] values where the second index ('sequence') is between 2 and 10.

Slicing on the first index works fine:

s['a':'b']
# Out[109]: 
# bucket  value
# a       0        1.828176
#         1        0.160496
#         5        0.401985
# b       0       -1.514268
#         1       -0.973915
#         2        1.285553
#         4       -0.194625
#         5       -0.144112

But not on the second, at least by what seems to be the two most obvious ways:

1) This returns elements 1 through 4, with nothing to do with the index values

s['b'][1:10]

# In [61]: s['b'][1:10]
# Out[61]: 
# 1     0.900439
# 2    -0.653940
# 4     0.082270
# 50   -0.255482

However, if I reverse the index and the first index is integer and the second index is a string, it works:

In [26]: s
Out[26]: 
0   a   -0.126299
1   a    1.810928
5   a    0.571873
0   b   -0.116108
1   b   -0.712184
2   b   -1.771264
4   b    0.148961
50  b    0.089683
0   c   -0.582578

In [25]: s[0]['a':'b']
Out[25]: 
a   -0.126299
b   -0.116108
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Use ix:

s['b'].ix[1:10]
# 1   -0.713173
# 2    1.280302
# 4   -0.667083

The docs note:

The most robust and consistent way of slicing ranges along arbitrary axes is described in the Advanced indexing section detailing the .ix method.

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It feels like there ought to be a way to do this in one pass (using loc / without chaining), however assignment (s['b'].ix[1:10]) works so I guess it's ok. –  Andy Hayden Jan 16 at 18:15
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The best way I can think of is to use 'select' in this case. Although it even says in the docs that "This method should be used only when there is no more direct way."

Indexing and selecting data

In [116]: s
Out[116]: 
a  0     1.724372
   1     0.305923
   5     1.780811
b  0    -0.556650
   1     0.207783
   4    -0.177901
   50    0.289365
   0     1.168115

In [117]: s.select(lambda x: x[0] == 'b' and 2 <= x[1] <= 10)
Out[117]: b  4   -0.177901
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Surprisingly (for me at least), although comparable for small Series, this starts to become slower than using ix when the Series is longer than 250. (Tested using %timeit in ipython.) –  Andy Hayden Nov 15 '12 at 9:43
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not sure if this is ideal but it works by creating a mask

In [59]: s.index
Out[59]: 
MultiIndex
[('a', 0) ('a', 1) ('a', 5) ('b', 0) ('b', 1) ('b', 2) ('b', 4)
 ('b', 50) ('c', 0)]
In [77]: s[(tpl for tpl in s.index if 2<=tpl[1]<=10 and tpl[0]=='b')]                                                               
Out[77]: 
b  2   -0.586568
   4    1.559988

EDIT : hayden's solution is the way to go

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you can use 2 <= tpl[1] <= 10 rather than 2<= and <=10. –  Andy Hayden Nov 15 '12 at 0:22
    
thanks. edited the post. –  locojay Nov 15 '12 at 0:27
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