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The following Java regex "seems" to be working . The intent is to remove the escapeChar - backslash "\". That is "\\{" should become "{".

My question is

  1. Isn't the 10 char in the regex field - the closing parenthesis ")" - closing the regex group that began at char5? So how is this working for the chars after the closing parenthesis at char10?
  2. Can someone break this regex down for me?

    str = str.replaceAll("\\\\([{}()\\[\\]\\\\!&:^~-])", "$1");
    
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4  
And people say regexes are unreadable? –  yshavit Nov 14 '12 at 23:43
1  
Very funny with the smiley at the end. –  Maarten Bodewes Nov 14 '12 at 23:44
    
The answer is: that regexp is terrible. Use whitespace and comments in your REs if they have any sort of nontrivial nesting. –  millimoose Nov 14 '12 at 23:47
    
@millimoose It is ugly because you can't have raw strings in Java, but otherwise it's not that bad. –  NullUserException Nov 14 '12 at 23:55
    
@NullUserException Java's RE engine permits the COMMENTS flag. It's a very good idea to use it when your RE is particularly line-noisy or nonobvious. –  millimoose Nov 15 '12 at 0:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Isn't the 10 char in the regex field - the closing parenthesis ")" - closing the regex group that began at char5? So how is this working for the chars after the closing parenthesis at char10?

No. The parentheses, both ( and ) are not meta-characters inside a character class. Note that inside a character class only these characters ^-[]\ have special meaning.

In the case of the caret (^) and the dash (-) they lose their special meaning if placed strategically within the char class: the caret if it's placed anywhere but the beginning, and the - if it's placed in the beginning or the end.

Can someone break this regex down for me?

Let's remove the double escapes needed by Java, which turns \\\\([{}()\\[\\]\\\\!&:^~-]) into:

\\([{}()\[\]\\!&:^~-])   # the actual regex

Which breaks down into:

\\                   # match literal backslash
 (                   # open capture group
  [                  # open character class, matching any of
   {}()\[\]\\!&:^~-  # these characters: {}()[]\!&:^~-
  ]                  # close character class
 )                   # close capture group

Basically it says: match a backslash, followed by one of these characters {}()[]\!&:^~-, and put it into a capture group. This capture group is used in the replacement ($1), which replaces the whole match (backlash + character) with the character itself.

In other words, this removes leading backslashes from those special characters.

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... in other words, this removes leading backslashes from those special characters –  Bohemian Nov 14 '12 at 23:52
    
@Bohemian Perfect. –  NullUserException Nov 14 '12 at 23:52
    
@NullUserException - Thank you very much. That was very helpful. –  MyFirstName MyLastName Nov 15 '12 at 0:41

After removing the escapes, we are left with

  \\([{}()\[\]\\!&:^~-])
     ^character class

Everything within the character class here is literal, except [, ] and \ which have been escaped.

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you've only removed 1 layer of escapes –  Sam I am Nov 14 '12 at 23:46
    
@SamIam That was probably the point. To get a RE, instead of "the hoops you have to jump through in Java because it doesn't have verbatim strings or RE literals". –  millimoose Nov 14 '12 at 23:49
    
@SamIam I removed the ones the string double quotes removed. The otherones are a part of the reg ex. Correct me if I am wrong. –  Anirudh Ramanathan Nov 14 '12 at 23:51
1  
@millimoose Cthulhu is right, the remaining backslashes in the answer are part of the regex. –  NullUserException Nov 14 '12 at 23:53
    
"except [ and ] which have been escaped"... And the backslash itself. –  NullUserException Nov 14 '12 at 23:59

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