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I'm sure there's a simple explanation, but I can't call functions below some other functions.

int methodOne() {
    std::cout << "Method 1";
    methodTwo(); //Problem is here. I cannot call methodTwo()
    return 0;
}

int methodTwo() {
    std::cout << "Method 2";
    return 0;
}

int main() {
    methodOne();
}
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6  
You have to declare a function before you use it in C++. –  chris Nov 15 '12 at 1:21
    
Where're your function prototypes? –  Han Nov 15 '12 at 1:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
int methodTwo();  // forward declaration

int methodOne() {
    std::cout << "Method 1";
    methodTwo(); // works!
    return 0;
}

int methodTwo() {
    std::cout << "Method 2";
    return 0;
}

C++ compilers don't backtrack. You have to declare a function before it is used. The linker can figure out the details later, but you have to let the compiler know about the function first, which is what the forward declaration is for.

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First, a point about terminology: in C++ the term method is never applied to free-standing functions, only to member functions.

And as you can see below, your example only makes sense for free-standing functions, so using the term “method” is quite misleading.

In C++ something must be declared before it's used.

For free functions this means you can't call a function at a point in the text before it's declared:

void foo() { bar(); }   // NO GOOD!
void bar() {}

However, when you write a class declaration like

struct S
{
    void foo() { bar(); }
    void bar() {}
};

the compiler (essentially) translates that to

struct S
{
    inline void foo();
    inline void bar();
};

inline void S::foo() { bar(); }
inline void S::bar() {}

and as you can see in this transformed and more basic code bar is not called before it's been declared.

In short, the compiler needs to know about something before it's used.

Finally, for the free-standing functions, one way to fix the problem is to reorder the declarations, and another way is to just declare the bar function first, called a forward declaration.

Reordering will generally save you work, because having a forward declaration means that both the forward declaration and the definition must be maintained. Newbies often get into situations where a forward declaration differs from the intended definition, so that they get mysterious compilation errors. It's generally best to avoid all that, simply by reordering the definitions: bar first, because it's called by foo.

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You get my +1 because you didn't use the redundant phrase "forward declare" when you meant simply "declare" –  Jonathan Wakely Nov 15 '12 at 1:28
    
@JonathanWakely: A forward declaration is a declaration without definition. This int foo() { } is a declaration and a definition. So, while forward declaration may at times seem redundant in terms of grammar it's certainly not in terms of programming. It has a very specific meaning in this context. –  Ed S. Nov 15 '12 at 1:43
    
@EdS. the OP's problem is that the function wasn't declared, it's irrelevant whether it's declared and defined, or just declared. The problem is that it's not declared. "Forward" adds nothing. –  Jonathan Wakely Nov 15 '12 at 23:32
    
I took my +1 away again for adding "forward declaration" and claiming that "method" means anything in C++ ... it's a term used in other languages but in C++ the correct term is just "member function" –  Jonathan Wakely Nov 15 '12 at 23:39
    
@jonathan: you can find common usage of "forward declaration" e.g. in the C++ FAQ, and e.g. in the Wikipedia article about it. And you can find the term "method" used about C++ member functions in e.g. the Wikipedia article about the "method" term. It's a general term in programming and computer science, ..., oh, why am I arguing, this is just silly! Just read up on the articles I linked to. And perhaps google it? –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 16 '12 at 1:46

Add forward declaration like this:

int methodTwo(); //Forward declaration

int methodOne() {
    std::cout << "Method 1";
    methodTwo(); //Problem is here. I cannot call methodTwo()
    return 0;
}

int methodTwo() {
    std::cout << "Method 2";
    return 0;
}

int main() {
    methodOne();
}
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You need to forward declare any functions if they weren't declared before the function you're calling.

int FunctionTwo();

and btw, method usually means a in class function.

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You simply need to forward declare MethodTwo before MethodOne's declaration

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