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I have tried this but it won't work:

#include <stdio.h>

    int * retArr()
    {
    int a[3][3] = {{1,2,3},{4,5,6},{7,8,9}};
    return a;
    }

    int main()
    {
    int a[3][3] = retArr();
    return 0;
    }

I get these errors:

Error 3 error C2075: 'a' : array initialization needs curly braces
4 IntelliSense: return value type does not match the function type

What am I doing wrong?

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Please post what kind of error you are getting –  djechlin Nov 15 '12 at 2:07
3  
Needs to not to that at all. You're returning the address of a local stack variable that is undefined the moment you leave scope. The pointer-incompatibility is just salt in the wound. –  WhozCraig Nov 15 '12 at 2:10
    
Out of interest, why do you want to return a 2D array from a function? There could be a good reason to want to do it, but it is quite possibly not the way to go... –  William Morris Nov 15 '12 at 2:47
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A struct is one approach:

struct t_thing { int a[3][3]; };

then just return the struct by value.

Full example:

struct t_thing {
    int a[3][3];
};

struct t_thing retArr() {
    struct t_thing thing = {
        {
            {1, 2, 3},
            {4, 5, 6},
            {7, 8, 9}
        }
    };

    return thing;
}

int main(int argc, const char* argv[]) {
    struct t_thing thing = retArr();
    ...
    return 0;
}

The typical problem you face is that int a[3][3] = {{1,2,3},{4,5,6},{7,8,9}}; in your example refers to memory which is reclaimed after the function returns. That means it is not safe for your caller to read (Undefined Behaviour).

Other approaches involve passing the array (which the caller owns) as a parameter to the function, or creating a new allocation (e.g. using malloc). The struct is nice because it can eliminate many pitfalls, but it's not ideal for every scenario. You would avoid using a struct by value when the size of the struct is not constant or very large.

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3  
+1: fastest way from seg-fault to correct. nice answer. –  WhozCraig Nov 15 '12 at 2:12
    
@WhozCraig thanks! –  justin Nov 15 '12 at 2:29
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#include <stdio.h>

int** retArr()
{
    static int a[3][3] = {{1,2,3},{4,5,6},{7,8,9}};
    return a;
}

int main()
{
    int** a = retArr();
    return 0;
}

You could also specify the returned variable as static. You also must declare the variable a in main as just int** (and not specify the dimensions).

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For this:

int * retArr() {
    int a[3][3] = {{1,2,3},{4,5,6},{7,8,9}};
    return a;
}

The array has local scope and is destroyed as soon as you exit the function. This means that return a; actually returns a dangling pointer.

To fix this, put the array in global scope, or use malloc() and copy the array into the allocated space.

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Several issues:

First of all, you cannot initialize an array from a function call; the language definition simply doesn't allow for it. An array of char may be initialized with a string literal, such as

char foo[] = "This is a test";

an array of wchar_t, char16_t, or char32_t may be initialized with a wide string literal, but otherwise the initializer must be a brace-enclosed list of values.

Secondly, you have a type mismatch; except when it is the operand of the sizeof or unary & operators, or is a string literal being used to initialize another array in a declaration, an expression of type "N-element array of T" will be converted to an expression of type "pointer to T", and the value of the expression will be the address of the first element;

In the function retArr, the type of a in the expression is "3-element array of 3-element array of int"; by the rule above, this will be converted to an expression of type "pointer to 3-element array of int", or int (*)[3]:

int (*retArr())[3]
{
  int a[3][3] = ...;
  return a;
}

but as Brendan points out, once retArr exits a no longer exists; the pointer value that is returned winds up being invalid.

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Needs to return int**, not int.

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Wrong for at least two reasons; the return type would be int (*)[3], not int **, and the array ceases to exist when the function returns, so the pointer value is invalid. –  John Bode Nov 15 '12 at 2:27
    
@JohnBode: int ** isn't wrong, it's just less strongly typed. (But returning a pointer to a stack variable is definitely wrong.) –  Carey Gregory Nov 15 '12 at 2:31
    
Well, that's why I posted asking what kind of error he is getting. I spotted the compile error; leaving my answer as it is valid. I would also say it's better to deal with pointers than arrays in function signatures but I will expand this tomorrow –  djechlin Nov 15 '12 at 2:36
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