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In the following code: symmetricCryptoKey represents private information that should always be secured, since it is the decrypted version of the encrypted symmetric key.

Question:

  • Are there additional enhancements I can make to secure the memory in a multi-tenant environment (hosted on Azure), specifically the interaction with symmetricCryptoKey or keyCache?

TL;DR code sample

                byte[] symmetricCryptoKey = RSA.Decrypt(key.Key, true);

                AesManaged algorithm = new AesManaged();
                algorithm.IV = key.iv;
                algorithm.Key = symmetricCryptoKey;
                keyCache[key.Version] = algorithm;

Full Codefile ... Codeplex source

using EncryptDecrypt.Exceptions;
using Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data.Services.Client;
using System.Net;
using System.Security.Cryptography;
using System.Security.Cryptography.X509Certificates;

namespace EncryptDecrypt
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Store the various encryption keys so that we don't need to load them from storage all the time
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>
    /// Is there something we should be doing to secure the memory used by this class?
    /// </remarks>
    internal class AzureTableCryptoKeyStore : IDisposable
    {
        private Dictionary<int, SymmetricAlgorithm> keyCache = new Dictionary<int, SymmetricAlgorithm>();
        internal CloudStorageAccount KeyStoreAccount { get; private set; }

        internal AzureTableCryptoKeyStore(CloudStorageAccount acct)
        {
            this.KeyStoreAccount = acct;

            SymmetricKeyStore keyTable = new SymmetricKeyStore(acct);
            List<SymmetricKey> allKeys = null;

            try
            {
                allKeys = keyTable.GetAllKeys();
            }
            catch (DataServiceQueryException dsq)
            {
                if (dsq.Response.StatusCode == (int)HttpStatusCode.NotFound)
                {
                    //Table hasn't been created, so there aren't any keys. Guess we'll just go with it. 
                    allKeys = new List<SymmetricKey>(0);
                }
                else
                {
                    throw new AzureTableCryptoInitializationException("Failed to load encryption keys from storage", dsq);
                }
            }
            catch (DataServiceClientException dsce)
            {
                if (dsce.StatusCode == (int)HttpStatusCode.NotFound)
                {
                    //Table hasn't been created, so there aren't any keys. Guess we'll just go with it. 
                    allKeys = new List<SymmetricKey>(0);
                }
                else
                {
                    throw new AzureTableCryptoInitializationException("Failed to load encryption keys from storage", dsce);
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw new AzureTableCryptoInitializationException("Could not load encryption keys table", ex);
            }


            foreach (var key in allKeys)
            {
                try
                {
                    X509Certificate2 certificate = CertificateHelper.GetCertificateByThumbprint(key.CertificateThumbprint);
                    if (certificate == null)
                    {
                        //Can't find the cert for this key, just continue
                        continue;
                    }

                    RSACryptoServiceProvider RSA;
                    try
                    {
                        RSA = (RSACryptoServiceProvider)certificate.PrivateKey;
                    }
                    catch (CryptographicException)
                    {
                        throw new AzureTableCryptoPrivateKeyNotAccessibleException(key.Version, key.CertificateThumbprint);
                    }

                    byte[] symmetricCryptoKey = RSA.Decrypt(key.Key, true);

                    AesManaged algorithm = new AesManaged();
                    algorithm.IV = key.iv;
                    algorithm.Key = symmetricCryptoKey;
                    keyCache[key.Version] = algorithm;
                }
                catch (AzureTableCryptoException)
                {
                    //Just rethrow these
                    throw;
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    throw new AzureTableCryptoInitializationException("Error initializing crypto key version " + key.Version, ex);
                }
            }
        }

        internal ICryptoTransform GetDecryptor(int version)
        {
            return GetAlgorithm(version).CreateDecryptor();
        }

        internal ICryptoTransform GetEncryptor(int version)
        {
            return GetAlgorithm(version).CreateEncryptor();
        }

        private SymmetricAlgorithm GetAlgorithm(int version)
        {
            SymmetricAlgorithm algo;
            if (!keyCache.TryGetValue(version, out algo))
            {
                throw new AzureTableCryptoNotFoundException(version);
            }
            return algo;
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dictionary<int, SymmetricAlgorithm> cache = keyCache;
            keyCache = null;

            foreach (var algo in cache.Values)
            {
                algo.Clear();
                algo.Dispose();
            }
        }
    }
}
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1  
I wouldn't really worry about this. If your code has a symmetric key, then any "encryption" done to that key is really just obfuscation; since anyone who has memory access to your process can just read whatever key you used to decrypt the symmetric key in use. Just make sure you zero out the memory in question when you're done with it (which your code already appears to do). –  Billy ONeal Nov 15 '12 at 6:13
    
@BillyONeal - I'm considering using this approach for servers hosted in my datacenter, and storing data at Microsoft. In this case, and any time there is similar segregation of administrative powers, then I would think the total data theft/loss/risk is limited. –  makerofthings7 Nov 15 '12 at 16:26
    
I don't see how the program running on someone else's servers changes anything. Microsoft has your code that extracts the actual key in use (after all, you did give it to them) so if they really wanted they could use your own code to extract the key in use. Your program has to have the key in cleartext when doing the actual encryption/decryption anyway, so so long as you make sure the memory holding the cleartext key is overwritten when you're done you're not going to make the security of the system any stronger. –  Billy ONeal Nov 15 '12 at 20:13
    
@BillyONeal You're correct in what you're saying, but perhaps I'm not explaining my deployment right. The code, certificate, and runtime execution resides in my private office. It uses HTTPS to encrypt and store data at the Azure data center. MSFT never gets my certificate. They only have the encrypted symmetric key which means nothing. –  makerofthings7 Nov 15 '12 at 20:37
    
That doesn't change my comment at all. (In fact, it makes my comment even more applicable) –  Billy ONeal Nov 15 '12 at 20:55

1 Answer 1

There are some things such as SecureString that you can use to help prevent memory sniffers from grabbing the key:

How is SecureString "encrypted" and still usable?

They are of course not perfect, since if the program itself has all the information to decrypt it, then everything is there in the computer that is necessary to view the string. It does reduce the scenarios in which it can be compromised though.

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