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I try to create the stream of all prime numbers in Python using the steve of Eratosthenes. However, I get an error.

Here is what I tried:

def genPrimes0(N):
    if (isPrime(N)):
        yield [N]
        filter(lambda x: N%x[0] == 0, genPrimes0(N+1))
    else:
        genPrimes0(N+1)


P = genPrimes0(2)

And here is the console:

>>> ================================ RESTART ================================
>>> 
>>> P.next()
[2]
>>> P.next()

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#10>", line 1, in <module>
    P.next()
StopIteration
>>> 

Any idea ?

EDIT:

I want recursively. I want to make an experiment using LAZY evaluation. Not interested about the problem in particular, but about the lazy evaluation -- I chosed this problem completely randomly to make the experiment.

I am using Python 2.7 with Idle, but this is not important. It is important to understand what happens.

share|improve this question
    
First, you don't yield anything in the else case, so it ends the iteration. Secondly, you don't want to do this recursively , you'll hit the recursive limit 1000 in. –  David Robinson Nov 15 '12 at 3:03
    
I WANT to do it recursively. Not interested otherwise –  alinsoar Nov 15 '12 at 3:07
    
Recursiveness has nothing to do with lazy evaluation. You can (and in this case should) do lazy evaluation with a for loop. –  David Robinson Nov 15 '12 at 4:48
    
(or with one of the below iterative solutions). –  David Robinson Nov 15 '12 at 4:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you're trying too hard in your current generator. You can get away with doing much less work (e.g. having an isPrime oracle) and just letting the algorithm do its thing:

def primes(n=2): # don't provide a different n value, or you will get odd results
    yield n
    yield from filter(lambda x: x % n, primes(n+1))

That uses some Python 3.3 specific syntax (yield from), but you can do an equivalent generator for earlier versions just by making it an explicit loop over the filter's results. @icktoofay's answer shows that kind of loop (and he also points out that filter is only a generator in Python 3, so use itertools.ifilter if you're using Python 2).

Example output:

>>> for p in primes():
    print(p)
    if p > 100:
        break


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share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, I thought the is-prime test was a little weird for a prime number generator too. –  icktoofay Nov 15 '12 at 3:35
    
Thank you. I like your solution :). –  alinsoar Nov 15 '12 at 4:15
    
I was interested in fact about making a recursive generator with a filter. I chosed isPrime completely at hasard. –  alinsoar Nov 15 '12 at 4:21
    
I'm glad you like it. For what it's worth, @HYRY's answer, though not recursive, is far more efficient (and it won't blow up upon hitting the Python interpreter's recursion limit). It's also a more exact implementation of the Sieve of Eratosthenes since it only filters on prime factors, rather than on all factors like mine does. The results are the same of course. –  Blckknght Nov 15 '12 at 4:31

This is not Eratosthenes, but som non tail recursiv function witch just fills stack. If you have isPrime function you should write like

def gen_primes(start):
   return itertools.filter(isPrime , itertools.count(start) )
share|improve this answer
    
I edited the original post. Please read it. –  alinsoar Nov 15 '12 at 3:14

You don't need recursive for lazy evaluation, you can use functions from itertools to calculate primes lazily.

import itertools    

def primes():
    numbers = itertools.count(2)
    while True:
        p = numbers.next()
        numbers = itertools.ifilter(lambda x, p=p: x%p, numbers)
        yield p

print list(itertools.islice(primes(), 100))
share|improve this answer
    
I am sorry, I said that I was interested only about recursive solutions. –  alinsoar Nov 15 '12 at 4:16

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