Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I thought the new notation works like this:

someArray[5] turns into

someArray[5] will actually turn into [someArray objectAtIndexedSubscript:5]

However, in NSArray.h and NSOrderedSet.h I saw this:

- (id)objectAtIndexedSubscript:(NSUInteger)idx NS_AVAILABLE(10_8, 6_0);

So, objectAtIndexedSubscript is only available for IOS6.

I experimented making this simple code:

NSArray * someArray =@[@"hello",@"World",@"World"];
NSOrderedSet * someOS = [NSOrderedSet orderedSetWithArray:someArray];
PO(someArray);
PO(someOS);
PO(someArray[0]);
PO(someOS[0]); //Exception thrown here

The code break at someOS[0]

-[__NSOrderedSetI objectAtIndexedSubscript:]: unrecognized selector sent to instance 0x8b1fac0

in BOTH NSArray and NSOrderedSet, there is a text NS_AVAILABLE(10_8, 6_0);

Yet it doesn't break on NSArray yet break on NSOrderedSet. Why?

Bonus: How do I make it work for NSOrderedSet too with category (need to check that it's not already defined)

share|improve this question
1  
What is your PO()? I have not gotten any exception. – sunkehappy Nov 15 '12 at 10:22
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have a better answer!

This code will dynamically patch NSOrderedSet for versions of iOS that don't support -objectAtIndexedSubscript:.

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import <objc/runtime.h>

id PatchedObjectAtIndexedSubscript(id self_, SEL cmd_, NSUInteger index)
{
    return [self_ objectAtIndex:index];
}

void PatchedSetObjectAtIndexedSubscript(id self_, SEL cmd_, id object, NSUInteger index)
{
    return [self_ replaceObjectAtIndex:index withObject:object];
}

void SIPatchNSOrderedSet()
{
    char types[6];

    if (!class_getInstanceMethod([NSOrderedSet class], @selector(objectAtIndexedSubscript:))) {
        sprintf(types, "@@:%s", @encode(NSUInteger));
        class_addMethod([NSOrderedSet class],
                        @selector(objectAtIndexedSubscript:),
                        (IMP)PatchedObjectAtIndexedSubscript,
                        types);
    }

    if (!class_getInstanceMethod([NSMutableOrderedSet class], @selector(setObject:atIndexedSubscript:))) {
        sprintf(types, "v@:@%s", @encode(NSUInteger));
        class_addMethod([NSMutableOrderedSet class],
                        @selector(setObject:atIndexedSubscript:),
                        (IMP)PatchedSetObjectAtIndexedSubscript,
                        types);
    }
}

At the start of your application (-application:didFinishLaunchingWithOptions: maybe) call SIPatchNSOrderedSet().

share|improve this answer
    
WOW. Just Wow. So we can't just make normal category can we? – Jim Thio Nov 17 '12 at 16:53
    
v@:@%s why not v@:@s? Why the % before s? Not listed here developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/… – Jim Thio Nov 17 '12 at 17:00
    
@JimThio It's not a normal category because I don't want to override the real implementation in iOS 6, so I conditionally override it when the method is not available. – Jeffery Thomas Nov 17 '12 at 19:19
    
@JimThio There is no listed encoding for NSUInteger in the doc, so I use @encode(NSUInteger) to get the encoding on the fly. %s is sprintf's way of inserting the actual encoding. – Jeffery Thomas Nov 17 '12 at 19:23
    
Thanks. This is truly awesome. – Jim Thio Nov 17 '12 at 23:35

In looking into this a little deeper and it looks like it NSOrderSet only has -objectAtIndexedSubscript: in iOS 6, but NSArray has -objectAtIndexedSubscript: in both iOS 5 and iOS 6.

My testing has shown the following.

- (void)testNSOrderedSetObjectAtIndexedSubscript
{
    NSString *systemVersion = [UIDevice currentDevice].systemVersion;
    NSString *message = @"NSOrderedSet for %@ does not respond to -objectAtIndexedSubscript:";

    NSOrderedSet *orderedSet = [NSOrderedSet orderedSet];
    STAssertTrue([orderedSet respondsToSelector:@selector(objectAtIndexedSubscript:)], message, systemVersion);
}

- (void)testNSArrayObjectAtIndexedSubscript
{
    NSString *systemVersion = [UIDevice currentDevice].systemVersion;
    NSString *message = @"NSArray for %@ does not respond to -objectAtIndexedSubscript:";

    NSArray *array = [NSArray array];
    STAssertTrue([array respondsToSelector:@selector(objectAtIndexedSubscript:)], message, systemVersion);
}

iOS 5.0 Simulator

Test Case '-[SIObjectTests testNSArrayObjectAtIndexedSubscript]' started.
Test Case '-[SIObjectTests testNSArrayObjectAtIndexedSubscript]' passed (0.000 seconds).
Test Case '-[SIObjectTests testNSOrderedSetObjectAtIndexedSubscript]' started.
/Users/jthomas/workspaces/si-catalog-order-ios/SICatalogOrderTests/SIObjectTests.m:20: error: -[SIObjectTests testNSOrderedSetObjectAtIndexedSubscript] : "[orderedSet respondsToSelector:@selector(objectAtIndexedSubscript:)]" should be true. NSOrderedSet for 5.0 does not respond to -objectAtIndexedSubscript:
Test Case '-[SIObjectTests testNSOrderedSetObjectAtIndexedSubscript]' failed (0.000 seconds).

iOS 6.0 Simulator

Test Case '-[SIObjectTests testNSArrayObjectAtIndexedSubscript]' started.
Test Case '-[SIObjectTests testNSArrayObjectAtIndexedSubscript]' passed (0.000 seconds).
Test Case '-[SIObjectTests testNSOrderedSetObjectAtIndexedSubscript]' started.
Test Case '-[SIObjectTests testNSOrderedSetObjectAtIndexedSubscript]' passed (0.000 seconds).
share|improve this answer
    
what is stassert true and what's the difference between that and others? – Jim Thio Nov 17 '12 at 16:51
    
@JimThio STAssert* functions are a part of OCUnit. – Jeffery Thomas Nov 17 '12 at 19:24
    
And why not just use normal NSAssert? – Jim Thio Nov 19 '12 at 2:48
    
Because the code is for a couple of Unit Tests. Unit Tests are a great way to track issues like this. – Jeffery Thomas Nov 19 '12 at 14:12

Jeffry answer is awesome and provide insight on how declaring your selector work.

For alternative, I simply do this:

self.businessDetailed.Phones.array[0];

Then I'll tell my future grandchildren to change that to

self.businessDetailed.Phones[0];

when iPhone 15 hit the shelf.

Much less work than Jeffry's solution at the cost of slightly increased marginal costs along the way.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.