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This question is about code I'm writing for an assignment, so yes, I have to use bubble sort, and yes, I have to use arrays.

Okay, so I be doing fine bubble sorting one dimensional arrays, but trying to sort two is causing me grief.

What I am trying to do is sort a list of names (ie. Joe, Bob, Betty, Jake) into alphabetical order. Using the following code the program tries to sort the things (names move around) but it usually is only partially correct.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;
void AlphaSort(char [][50]);
void GetInput(char [][50]);
void PrintArray(char [][50]);

int main()
{
    char name[4][50];
    cout << "Please enter 4 names:\n";
    GetInput(name);
    cout << endl << "The following names were received:\n";
    PrintArray(name);
    cout << endl << "The names will now be sorted.\n\n"
        << "Calling Sort Function....\n";
    AlphaSort(name);
    cout << endl << "The sorted name order is now:\n";
    PrintArray(name);

    return 0;
}

void GetInput(char name[][50])
{
    int i;

    for(i=0; i<4; i++)
        cin.getline(name[i], 50);
}

void PrintArray(char name[][50])
{
    int i;

    for(i=0; i<4; i++)
        cout << name[i] << endl;
}

void AlphaSort(char name[][50]) //I'm pretty sure the problem is in here.
{
    int Nnames = 4, pass, column, row, letter, sorted;
    char temp[50];

    cout << "Sorting Function Successfully Called...\n"
        << endl << "Names recieved by sort function:\n";

    PrintArray(name);

    //Specifically in this attempt at a bubble sort.
    for(pass=0; pass<(Nnames-1); pass++)
    {
        for(row=0; row<(Nnames-pass-1); row++)
        {
            for(column=0, sorted=0; sorted==0; column++)
            {
                if(name[row][column]>name[row+1][column])
                {
                    for(letter=0; letter<50; letter++)
                        temp[letter] = name[row][letter];
                    for(letter=0; letter<50; letter++)
                        name[row][letter]= name[row+1][letter];
                    for(letter=0; letter<50; letter++)
                        name[row+1][letter] = temp[letter];
                    sorted = 1;
                }
                else if (name[row][column] == name[row+1][column]);
            }
        }
    }    

    cout << endl << "Name order post sort:\n";

    PrintArray(name);
}

Running this currently looks something like this usually.

Please enter 4 names: Hammy Harry Ashe Aaron

The following names were received: Hammy Harry Ashe Aaron

The names will now be sorted.

Calling Sort Function.... Sorting Function Successfully Called...

Names recieved by sort function: Hammy Harry Ashe Aaron

Name order post sort: Aaron Ashe Harry Hammy

The sorted name order is now: Aaron Ashe Harry Hammy

I've been looking around at similar problems, but I can't figure out why it's being silly.

share|improve this question
    
Someone asked what sorted was for here: for(column=0, sorted=0; sorted==0; column++) I wasn't sure how to make it sort alphabetically past the first character only when needed, so that what I tried. So in theory, that was so it would loop until it decided that the names were ordered, or rather, it loops until it finds letters that are no longer equal. This was for names like Harry and Hammy that wouldn't be sorted on the surface. –  OkaMoez Nov 15 '12 at 3:59
1  
Write two more functions (assuming you can't use standard library functions). One that compares two strings, to determine their relative order, and one that swaps two strings. Ensure that those work correctly, and your bubble sort function will be much easier to debug. –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 15 '12 at 4:02
    
I would separate your string-comparing function out into its own function. Then, in your function, you can just get the result of "is this bigger or smaller" and not have to worry about the actual "bigger or lesser than" issue in your sorting code, which is likely what's confusing things. I'm sure someone will point out your exact error in a second, however. :D –  Marshall Conover Nov 15 '12 at 4:04
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1 Answer 1

It seems my problem lay in how my if statement didn't address the possibility of it being in the right order already, which made it loop until it found a letter later on that it wanted to switch. The fixed code looks like this:

void AlphaSort(char name[][50])
{
     int Nnames = 4, pass, column, row, letter, sorted;
     char temp[50];

     cout << "Sorting Function Successfully Called...\n"
          << endl << "Names recieved by sort function:\n";

     PrintArray(name);

     for(pass=0; pass<(Nnames-1); pass++)
     {
                 for(row=0; row<(Nnames-pass-1); row++)
                 {
                            for(column=0, sorted=0; sorted==0; column++)
                            {
                                          if(name[row][column]>name[row+1][column])
                                          {
                                                                     for(letter=0; letter<50; letter++)
                                                                              temp[letter] = name[row][letter];
                                                                     for(letter=0; letter<50; letter++)
                                                                              name[row][letter]= name[row+1][letter];
                                                                     for(letter=0; letter<50; letter++)
                                                                              name[row+1][letter] = temp[letter];
                                                                     sorted = 1;
                                          }
                                          else if (name[row][column]<name[row+1][column])//This is the fix.
                                               sorted = 1;
                            }
                 }
     }    

     cout << endl << "Name order post sort:\n";

     PrintArray(name);
}
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