Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I have tried every combination of #include statements that I can think of, and nothing is working. I am trying to write a basic inheritance program but i keep getting the error error: expected class-name before '}' token and I just do not know what to do about it anymore. I've tried having my main() include the .cpp file of the Executive class, however this error shows up. The program includes 5 types of employees all inherited from the Employee class, and I'm assuming that they are all the same error:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

#include "Employee.cpp"
#include "Manager.cpp"
#include "Executive.cpp"
#include "Technical.cpp"
#include "Software.cpp"
#include "Test.cpp"

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    Employee emp[3];

    Executive emp0("John", "Doe", "VP", 100000.0, 1000000.0, 2000.0);
    Software emp1("Vincent", "Giuliana", "Project Leader", 150000.0, 200000.0, 1000.0);
    Test emp2("Lauren", "Wallis", "Overseer of Testing", 95000, 115000);

    emp[0] = emp0;
    emp[1] = emp1;
    emp[2] = emp2;

    for(int i=0; i<3; i++)
        emp[i].displayInformation();

    emp0.displayInformation();
    emp1.displayInformation();
    emp2.displayInformation();

    return 0;
}

My Employee.h header file is as follows:

#ifndef EMPLOYEE_H_INCLUDED
#define EMPLOYEE_H_INCLUDED

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Employee
{
private:
    string fName, lName, jobTitle;
    double baseSalary, salary;

public:
    Employee();
    Employee(string fName, string lName, string jobTitle, double baseSalary);
    void calculateSalary(double baseSalary);
    void displayName();
    void displayBSalary();
    void displayJobTitle();
    void displayInformation();

...
getters
...

...
setters
...
};

#endif // EMPLOYEE_H_INCLUDED

My Employee.cpp is:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

#include "Employee.h"

using namespace std;

Employee::Employee()
{
    fName = "";
    lName = "";
    jobTitle = "";
    baseSalary = 000000;
}

...

void Employee::setBSalary(double bs) //sets base salary as parameter
{
    baseSalary = bs;
}

The top of the Executive.h header class:

#ifndef EXECUTIVE_H_INCLUDED
#define EXECUTIVE_H_INCLUDED

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

//#include "Employee.h"

using namespace std;

class Executive : public Employee
{
private:
    string fName, lName, jobTitle;
    double baseSalary, salary, bonus, stockOption;

public:
...
};

#endif // Executive_H_INCLUDED

And last but not least, the Executive.cpp file... #include #include

#include "Executive.h"

using namespace std;

Executive::Executive()
{
    fName = fN;
    lName = lN;
    jobTitle = jt;
    baseSalary = bs;
    bonus = b;
    stockOption = so;
}

...

void Executive::setSO(double so) //sets stock option as parameter
{
    stockOption = so;
}

I think that I have tried to include each header in each file and still, nothing. Any help would be appreciated, and I thank anyone very much in advance!

share|improve this question
1  
You should tag questions with the language you are using. More people will see your question then. – Felix Kling Nov 15 '12 at 4:53
    
For what file and what line do you get the error? – jogojapan Nov 15 '12 at 5:13
    
Executive.h line 12 class Executive : public Employee { – Vincent Giuliana Nov 15 '12 at 5:15
3  
Why are you including .cpp files into your main program? That's not the way things are usually done. – Mark Ransom Nov 15 '12 at 5:17
    
How do you build this? Do you compile each .cpp file separately (using GCC, you'd do this with -o Executive.o -c Executive.cpp), and finally link them together? In that case, do you get the error when you compile Executive.cpp, or when you compile one of the other files? – jogojapan Nov 15 '12 at 5:30

You must

#include "Employee.h"

in Executive.h, because the compiler must see the declaration of Employee, when a class inherits from it. So, just remove the comments from the #include

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you -- that got rid of that error, but then a bunch of redefinition errors showed up in their place. – Vincent Giuliana Nov 15 '12 at 6:27
    
nevermind -- I figured it out! – Vincent Giuliana Nov 15 '12 at 6:29
    
You're welcome! :-) – Olaf Dietsche Nov 15 '12 at 8:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.