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I have searched and searched for ways to do this but have found very limited information.

I have a MySQL table 'msgdb' that contains a field 'ttime' that is in the format double(25,8) (example row = 1352899856.95249200).

I need to routinely cleanup the table by removing any rows where the field 'ttime' is <= today's date -5 days.

These are the only two lines of code I could find related to double to time conversion but cannot get either to work.

SELECT ADDDATE(ADDDATE(ADDDATE('1899-12-31 00:00:00',FLOOR(ttime)), INTERVAL -1 DAY),INTERVAL(MOD(ttime,1)*86400)SECOND) AS TrueDate FROM msgdb

select date('1899-12-31 00:00:00'+ INTERVAL ttime * 24*3600 SECOND) as date from msgdb

I have tried first to display any rows that match the criteria using the code below, before I started using DELETE FROM to make sure I'm getting the correct results.

 $query = "select date('1899-12-31 00:00:00'+ INTERVAL ttime * 24*3600 SECOND) as date from msgdb";
 $result = mysql_db_query ($dbname, $query, $link);
 while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result)) {
   echo $row['date'];
   echo '<br>';
 }

and also

 $query = "SELECT ADDDATE(ADDDATE(ADDDATE('1899-12-31 00:00:00',FLOOR(ttime)), INTERVAL -1 DAY),INTERVAL(MOD(ttime,1)*86400)SECOND) AS TrueDate FROM msgdb";
 $result = mysql_db_query ($dbname, $query, $link);
 while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result)) {
   echo $row['TrueDate'];
   echo '<br>';
 }

but both are returning nothing.

UPDATE: Ok so by using this code:

$query = "select ttime from msgdb";
$result = mysql_db_query ($dbname, $query, $link);
while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result)) {
        echo date('m-j-Y, H:i:s', $row[0]);
    echo '<br>';
}

I am able to see it convert 'ttime' field from the stored value of 1352899856.95249200 to 11-14-2012, 07:30:56.

So how would I DELETE from the table all rows where ttime is <=now - 5 days?

share|improve this question
    
Is there any reason you're using 1899 as a base date? Are you a time traveller? –  tadman Nov 15 '12 at 5:03
    
@tadman That was just the way I found the code. –  Rodney Nov 15 '12 at 5:14
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Figuring out which records have a date before a point in time should be easy:

DELETE FROM table WHERE ttime <= DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 5 DAY);

It might also be better to use UTC_TIMESTAMP() if you store all your times in UTC, which is the only sane way to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
I have no control over the format that is being stored in the table it is from a live chat routine. It is storing the datetime in the double format that looks like 1352899856.95249200 –  Rodney Nov 15 '12 at 5:15
    
The field is in unixtime, so how would I incorporate UTC_TIMESTAMP() into DELETE FROM table WHERE ttime <= DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 5 DAY); ? –  Rodney Nov 15 '12 at 5:52
1  
Got it. DELETE FROM from msgdb WHERE ttime <= UNIX_TIMESTAMP(DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 5 day)) –  Rodney Nov 15 '12 at 6:03
    
Yeah, that should be it. Wasn't clear in your question that you were dealing with raw UNIX times. That they're fractional is odd to say the least. –  tadman Nov 15 '12 at 15:34
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