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In a switch, if we write any word or single letter instead of default it does not throw an error. e.g.

switch(10)
{
    case 1:
    break;

    hello:
    break;
}

It runs without throwing an error.

Can anyone explain how this works?

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3  
Reminds me of an old joke/trick: C-style languages understand URLs! You can just paste http://www.google.com/ anywhere on its own line! =P –  Izkata Nov 15 '12 at 13:40

3 Answers 3

It is compiling because hello: is a label and thus can be the destination of a goto. When I compiled this I got warnings about an unreferenced label (since I did not have a goto)

Here is an example you could throw in LINQPad - you will notice that it prints both "1" and "hello":

switch(1)
{
    case 1:
        "1".Dump();
        goto hello;
    break;

    hello:
        "hello".Dump();
        break;
}
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It's unrelated to the switch statement. It's a label identifier for the (rarely-used due to being bad practice) goto statement.

goto something2;
something1:
    Console.WriteLine("world");
    goto done;
something2:
    Console.WriteLine("hello");
goto something1;
done:
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For your example you can see the following code snippet:

switch (10)
{
    case 1:
        break;

    hello:
        Console.Write("In hello label");
        break;
    case 2:
        goto hello;
        break;
}

In the above you are defining a label for goto statement in switch statement. If switch statement falls to case 2, then it will go the label hello. Since your original code snippet doesn't have a goto hello; you will get warning of an unreferenced label.

Your label hello doesn't have to do anything with the switch statement (except being defined inside).

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