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How to fire up event from a separate C# program?

The C# program I am working on has two separate components: Task Creator (TC) and Task Processor (TP). TC is attached to a web service that constantly inserts new tasks into a database table. On the other hand TP reads from the same table and processes each tasks then updates the status back to the same table. It’s almost like a queue but done using database rather than e.g. MSMQ. Every 5 seconds TP wakes up and reads from the table to check for unprocessed tasks however this has some performance impacts. When there’s no new tasks it’s a bit of waste to fire up a select from where SQL statement. The ideal way is to have some kind of notification method that when new tasks are inserted TP will get notified and then wakes up from its dream to check for new tasks.

Current solution:

diagram of current solution

Ideal solution:

diagram of idealsolution

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would recommend MSMQ. :) I am not sure why you are not using it, however you did mention it in your question. This is pretty much exactly what MSMQ was designed for...durable eventing between applications. It primarily supports the pub/sub message model...which based on your "Ideal Solution" is exactly what you need: TC is the publisher, TP is a subscriber. TC registers the task, then drops a message in its publish queue. The TP task does not need to be up and running for TC to successfully drop a message in its queue, however when the TP task IS running, it will receive notifications and handle messages in the queue in the prioritized order the arrive.

If MSMQ is not an option, you could also use WCF. Rather than pub/sub, with WCF you could opt for a FAF (fire and forget) message model. TP would publish a service which TC would consume. TC would only need to fire a message off to TP's service to notify TP of new tasks. The downside of this model is that TC is dependent on TP, which might be less than idea. TP also has to be running for TC to successfully function, since it is dependent upon TP's service. With the MSMQ approach, neither TP nor TC are dependent on each other, they are only dependent upon MSMQ (a lower-coupling approach.)

EDIT:

An example of how to use MSMQ to fire events from TC and respond to events in TP.

// TC message queue manager, sends messages
public class TaskMessageQueueManager
{
  public void NotifySubscribersOfNewTasks()
  {
    var queue = getQueue(".\private$\TaskNotifications");
    queue.Send("Tasks waiting.");
  }

  private MessageQueue getQueue(string name)
  {
    MessageQueue queue = null;
    try
    {
      if (!MessageQueue.Exists(name))
      {
        queue = MessageQueue.Create(name);
      }
      else
      {
        queue = new MessageQueue(name);
      }
    } 
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
      throw new InvalidOperationException("An error occurred while retrieving the message queue '" + name + "'.", ex);
    }

    return queue;
  }
}

// TP message queue handler, receives messages
public class TaskMessageQueueHandler
{
  private Thread m_thread;
  private ManualResetEvent m_signal;

  public void Start()
  {
    m_signal = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    m_thread = new Thread(MSMQReceiveLoop);
    m_thread.Start();

  }

  public void Stop()
  {
    m_signal.Set();
  }

  private void MSMQReceiveLoop()
  {
    bool running = true;
    MessageQueue queue = getQueue(".\private$\TaskNotifications");

    while (running)
    {
      try
      {
        var message = queue.Receive(); // Blocks here until a message is received by MSMQ

        if (message.Body.ToString() == "Tasks waiting.")
        {
          // TODO: Fire off process, perhaps another thread, to handle waiting tasks
        }

        if (m_signal.WaitOne(10)) // Non-blocking check for exit signal
        {
          running = false; // If Stop method has been called, the signal will be set and we can end loop
        } 
      }
      catch
      {
         // handle error
         running = false;
      }
    }
  }
}

The message does not have to be simple text. You can send an object or object graph, and it will automatically be serialized and formatted as XML by default. I believe you can also serialize data in a binary format, if that is what you need. Either way, you'll notice that there are no Thread.Sleep calls or polling anywhere. The loop exits based on a ManualResetEvent, allowing you to cleanly end the thread without a hard abort.

share|improve this answer
    
With MSMQ, the queue reader still needs to sleep and wake up periodically. Or am I missing something? – Jeff Aug 27 '09 at 6:56
    
Not to my knowledge. With the .NET managed wrapper for MSMQ, if you call Recieve() on a queue, it blocks until a message is received. Just set up a processing loop, call Recieve(), and when a message IS received, handle it. Shouldn't be more complicated than that. – jrista Aug 27 '09 at 7:02
    
As you said I need some kind of looping to call Receive() which is exactly what I am trying to get rid of. Isn't the 5 seconds sleep/wake up is the looping you are talking about? – Jeff Aug 27 '09 at 7:11
    
No, I am not talking about a sleep at all. The Recieve call BLOCKS...that means you simply create a while loop, call myQueue.Recieve(), and it waits. You don't need to call sleep to wait for a period of time. A blocking call waits automatically, listening for an event. I'll add a code example for you. – jrista Aug 27 '09 at 15:29

Check out SQL Server 2005 Query Notifications. I just learned that it seems that it's been pulled from SQL Server 2008 so it might not be the best idea after all.

I second that MSMQ is probably a much better way. Combined with nServiceBus you could have a winner.

Another approach could be thread synchronization events.

In TP you could have something like:

EventWaitHandle taskEvent = new EventWaitHandle(true,
                EventResetMode.AutoReset,
                "newTask",
                out wasCreated);
new Thread(WaitForTask).Start();
...

public void WaitForTask() { while (true) { taskEvent.WaitOne(); ProcessTasks();} }

And in TC:

bool eventExist;
while (!eventExist)
{
    try
    {
        taskEvent= EventWaitHandle.OpenExisting("newTask");
        eventExist = true;
    }
    catch (WaitHandleCannotBeOpenedException)
    {
        eventExist = false;
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
    }
}

CreateNewTask();
taskEvent.Set();

Not that I see how a call every five second could be such a performance hog.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not favouring SQL Server 2005 Broker Service actually. I think what I am interested in is the implementation of some kind of constant monitoring mechanism that doesn’t require periodically sleep/wake up. The media that carries the “messages” can be anything (MSMQ, Database or whatever). I’ve heard about MassTransit / NServiceBus / Rhino.ServiceBus but never actually used them. Would I be able to eliminate the sleep/wake up scenarios by using those libraries? – Jeff Aug 27 '09 at 7:01
    
NServiceBus is an AWESOME ESB wrapped around MSMQ. If you need all the benefits of an ESB, I highly recommend it. If you just need basic eventing, then I would use MSMQ directly via the .NET managed API for it. – jrista Aug 27 '09 at 7:04
    
@Jeffrey, yes you can get an event fired when a message arrives at an associated queue. I also agree with @jrista that for a simple scenario a service bus is not needed but since you mentioned that you did simplify the question I saw no harm in hinting of it. – Jonas Elfström Aug 27 '09 at 7:14
    
So to answer the question myself, it's impossible to fire event unless I use 3rd party to join the 2 programs together in order to exchange method reference. – Jeff Aug 27 '09 at 7:19
    
Could thread synchronization solve your problem? See above. – Jonas Elfström Aug 27 '09 at 9:30

When there’s no new tasks it’s a bit of waste to fire up a select from where SQL statement.

A select on a single table, every 5 secs with simple criteria and none rows returned usually costs next to nothing, dont worry.

share|improve this answer
    
I am only simplifying the case so that it’s easier to ask the question. – Jeff Aug 27 '09 at 6:54

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