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I'm trying to direct a browser to a different page. If I wanted a GET request, I might say

document.location.href = 'http://example.com/q=a';

But the resource I'm trying to access won't respond properly unless I use a POST request. If this were not dynamically generated, I might use the HTML

<form action="http://example.com/" method="POST">
  <input type="hidden" name="q" value="a">
</form>

Then I would just submit the form from the DOM.

But really I would like JavaScript code that allows me to say

post_to_url('http://example.com/', {'q':'a'});

What's the best cross browser implementation?

Edit

I'm sorry I was not clear. I need a solution that changes the location of the browser, just like submitting a form. If this is possible with XMLHttpRequest, it is not obvious. And this should not be asynchronous, nor use XML, so Ajax is not the answer.

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7  
Why is the common answer to create a form and submitting it? Isn't this unnecessary overhead? Isn't there a simple way of posting a data dictionary or something else built-in? –  Gabriel Fair Nov 27 '12 at 1:42
    
http://example.com/?q=a note the query string identifier –  verbumSapienti Apr 2 at 10:51

23 Answers 23

up vote 919 down vote accepted
function post(path, params, method) {
    method = method || "post"; // Set method to post by default if not specified.

    // The rest of this code assumes you are not using a library.
    // It can be made less wordy if you use one.
    var form = document.createElement("form");
    form.setAttribute("method", method);
    form.setAttribute("action", path);

    for(var key in params) {
        if(params.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
            var hiddenField = document.createElement("input");
            hiddenField.setAttribute("type", "hidden");
            hiddenField.setAttribute("name", key);
            hiddenField.setAttribute("value", params[key]);

            form.appendChild(hiddenField);
         }
    }

    document.body.appendChild(form);
    form.submit();
}

Example:

post('/contact/', {name: 'Johnny Bravo'});

EDIT: Since this has gotten upvoted so much, I'm guessing people will be copy-pasting this a lot. So I added the hasOwnProperty check to fix any inadvertent bugs.

share|improve this answer
7  
Your guess was right, it's not necessary to append the form. Looks good –  Joseph Holsten Sep 25 '08 at 16:14
6  
This doesn't work in IE, as the name won't be set on the hidden fields: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms534184(VS.85).aspx –  insin Sep 25 '08 at 18:14
7  
for IE6 it is required to append the form to the document in order to submit it. (example as shown works fine fine in IE6) –  Jacco Sep 6 '09 at 12:30
7  
In FireFox 3.0.10 the document.body.appendChild(form); is necessary. However in Safari its not necessary. –  neoneye Sep 17 '09 at 15:39
8  
In case anyone is wondering, params is expecting an associative array or object. For example var params = new Array(); params["file"] = 'test.pdf'; –  PaulSkinner Jul 25 '13 at 15:35

Using the createElement function provided in this answer, which is necessary due to IE's brokenness with the name attribute on elements created normally with document.createElement:

function postToURL(url, values) {
    values = values || {};

    var form = createElement("form", {action: url,
                                      method: "POST",
                                      style: "display: none"});
    for (var property in values) {
        if (values.hasOwnProperty(property)) {
            var value = values[property];
            if (value instanceof Array) {
                for (var i = 0, l = value.length; i < l; i++) {
                    form.appendChild(createElement("input", {type: "hidden",
                                                             name: property,
                                                             value: value[i]}));
                }
            }
            else {
                form.appendChild(createElement("input", {type: "hidden",
                                                         name: property,
                                                         value: value}));
            }
        }
    }
    document.body.appendChild(form);
    form.submit();
    document.body.removeChild(form);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Do you need to remove the child after submission? Doesn't the page go away anyway? –  Nils May 31 '12 at 22:31
    
There is no use to remove the child after submission, except if a session is used and those data are saved. –  Miloš Jul 20 '12 at 7:07
1  
@CantucciHQ The page might just as well stay unchanged even if form target is not set. There is 204 No Content, for example. –  Eugene Ryabtsev Jan 30 at 11:41

This would be a version of the selected answer using jQuery.

// Post to the provided URL with the specified parameters.
function post(path, parameters) {
    var form = $('<form></form>');

    form.attr("method", "post");
    form.attr("action", path);

    $.each(parameters, function(key, value) {
        var field = $('<input></input>');

        field.attr("type", "hidden");
        field.attr("name", key);
        field.attr("value", value);

        form.append(field);
    });

    // The form needs to be a part of the document in
    // order for us to be able to submit it.
    $(document.body).append(form);
    form.submit();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't work, not in Chrome 10 with JQuery 1.2.6 anyway. You can't set the type of a field after creating it. "Uncaught type property can't be changed". See stackoverflow.com/questions/3526059/… –  mhenry1384 Apr 4 '11 at 21:52
    
It doesn't work in Firefox 4 either because you can't append to a document, you have to append to a document body. –  mhenry1384 Apr 5 '11 at 19:19
    
Fixed: now appending to document.body –  Ryan Delucchi Apr 5 '11 at 21:01
1  
The standard way should be $('<input />'). –  rhgb Aug 19 '12 at 5:53
1  
For IE8+ you don't need to append form to DOM for submitting it, i tried it myself and it works. –  Sanjeev Jul 31 at 4:13

A simple quick-and-dirty implementation of @Aaron answer:

document.body.innerHTML += '<form id="dynForm" action="http://example.com/" method="post"><input type="hidden" name="q" value="a"></form>';
document.getElementById("dynForm").submit();

Of course, you should rather use a JavaScript framework such as Prototype or jQuery...

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2  
Is there a way to do this without there being a web page loaded in the current browser window/tab? –  pbreitenbach Sep 24 '10 at 20:37
2  
yes use the attribute target='_blank' in the form element –  Spidfire Apr 26 '11 at 16:03

If you have Prototype installed, you can tighten up the code to generate and submit the hidden form like this:

 var form = new Element('form',
                        {method: 'post', action: 'http://example.com/'});
 form.insert(new Element('input',
                         {name: 'q', value: 'a', type: 'hidden'}));
 $(document.body).insert(form);
 form.submit();
share|improve this answer

Rakesh Pai's answer is amazing, but there is an issue that occurs for me (in Safari) when you try to post a form with a field called submit. For example, post_to_url("http://google.com/",{ submit: "submit" } );. I have patched the function slightly to walk around this variable space collision.

    function post_to_url(path, params, method) {
        method = method || "post";

        var form = document.createElement("form");

        //Move the submit function to another variable
        //so that it doesn't get overwritten.
        form._submit_function_ = form.submit;

        form.setAttribute("method", method);
        form.setAttribute("action", path);

        for(var key in params) {
            var hiddenField = document.createElement("input");
            hiddenField.setAttribute("type", "hidden");
            hiddenField.setAttribute("name", key);
            hiddenField.setAttribute("value", params[key]);

            form.appendChild(hiddenField);
        }

        document.body.appendChild(form);
        form._submit_function_(); //Call the renamed function.
    }
    post_to_url("http://google.com/", { submit: "submit" } ); //Works!
share|improve this answer

You can dynamically create a form, and then post that.

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Three options here.

  1. Standard JavaScript answer: Use a framework! Most Ajax frameworks will have abstracted you an easy way to make an XMLHTTPRequest POST.

  2. Make the XMLHTTPRequest request yourself, passing post into the open method instead of get. (More information in Using POST method in XMLHTTPRequest (Ajax).)

  3. Via JavaScript, dynamically create a form, add an action, add your inputs, and submit that.

share|improve this answer
3  
XMLHTTPRequest doesn't update the window. Are you trying to say I should end with the AJAX with a document.write(http.responseText)? –  Joseph Holsten Sep 25 '08 at 16:12
7  
Why should one add 30k+ to he's project if he dosent do anything else with the framework ? –  Dementic Nov 7 '11 at 15:26

One solution is to generate the form and submit it. One implementation is

function post_to_url(url, params) {
    var form = document.createElement('form');
    form.action = url;
    form.method = 'POST';

    for (var i in params) {
        if (params.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
            var input = document.createElement('input');
            input.type = 'hidden';
            input.name = i;
            input.value = params[i];
            form.appendChild(input);
        }
    }

    form.submit();
}

So I can implement a URL shortening bookmarklet with a simple

javascript:post_to_url('http://is.gd/create.php', {'URL': location.href});
share|improve this answer

this is the answer of rakesh, but with support for arrays (which is quite common in forms):

plain javascript:

function post_to_url(path, params, method) {
    method = method || "post"; // Set method to post by default, if not specified.

    // The rest of this code assumes you are not using a library.
    // It can be made less wordy if you use one.
    var form = document.createElement("form");
    form.setAttribute("method", method);
    form.setAttribute("action", path);

    var addField = function( key, value ){
        var hiddenField = document.createElement("input");
        hiddenField.setAttribute("type", "hidden");
        hiddenField.setAttribute("name", key);
        hiddenField.setAttribute("value", value );

        form.appendChild(hiddenField);
    }; 

    for(var key in params) {
        if(params.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
            if( params[key] instanceof Array ){
                for(var i = 0; i < params[key].length; i++){
                    addField( key, params[key][i] )
                }
            }
            else{
                addField( key, params[key] ); 
            }
        }
    }

    document.body.appendChild(form);
    form.submit();
}

oh, and here's the jquery version: (slightly different code, but boils down to the same thing)

function post_to_url(path, params, method) {
    method = method || "post"; // Set method to post by default, if not specified.

    var form = $(document.createElement( "form" ))
        .attr( {"method": method, "action": path} );

    $.each( params, function(key,value){
        $.each( value instanceof Array? value : [value], function(i,val){
            $(document.createElement("input"))
                .attr({ "type": "hidden", "name": key, "value": val })
                .appendTo( form );
        }); 
    } ); 

    form.appendTo( document.body ).submit(); 
}
share|improve this answer
1  
p.s. i now enjoy using that function but instead of submitting the form at the end i simply return it back to the caller. this way i can easily set additional attributes or do other stuff with it if needed. –  kritzikratzi May 26 '12 at 16:09
    
Great! very useful. A small change for people who rely on PHP at server side of this form, I changed addField( key, params[key][i] ) to addField(key +'[]', params[key][i]). This makes the $_POST[key] available as array. –  Thava Nov 18 '13 at 1:07
    
@Thava you could also set name="bla[]" on your input field. anyways, there are languages other than php that don't support the [] syntax so i'm leaving this unchanged. –  kritzikratzi Nov 18 '13 at 4:20

Here is how I wrote it using jQuery. Tested in Firefox and Internet Explorer.

function postToUrl(url, params, newWindow)
{
    var form = $('<form>');
    form.attr('action', url);
    form.attr('method', 'POST');
    if(newWindow){ form.attr('target', '_blank'); }

    var addParam = function(paramName, paramValue){
        var input = $('<input type="hidden">');
        input.attr({ 'id':     paramName,
                     'name':   paramName,
                     'value':  paramValue });
        form.append(input);
    };

    // Params is an Array.
    if(params instanceof Array){
        for(var i=0; i<params.length; i++){
            addParam(i, params[i]);
        }
    }

    // Params is an Associative array or Object.
    if(params instanceof Object){
        for(var key in params){
            addParam(key, params[key]);
        }
    }

    // Submit the form, then remove it from the page
    form.appendTo(document.body);
    form.submit();
    form.remove();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Looks good, but didn't work for me. –  Eric Wilson Nov 1 '10 at 15:56
    
Worked for me. Thanks. (Tested in Chrome) –  dannie.f Dec 23 '10 at 13:43
    
I think the problem here might be that the form is removed before the submission returns. I've heard that in some browsers if you move or remove the form before the submit completes, the handlers won't fire. Instead, remove the form from the document in the handler. –  Jeff DQ May 12 '11 at 0:18

And the answer is.....

no, you cant have the javascript post request like a form submit.

What you can have is a form in html, then submit it with the javascript. (as explained many times on this page)

You can create the html yourself, you don't need javascript to write the html. That would be silly if people suggested that. (trololol)

<form id="ninja" action="http://example.com/" method="POST">
  <input id="donaldduck" type="hidden" name="q" value="a">
</form>

Your function would just configure the form the way you want it.

function postToURL(a,b,c){
   document.getElementById("ninja").action     = a;
   document.getElementById("donaldduck").name  = b;
   document.getElementById("donaldduck").value = c;
   document.getElementById("ninja").submit();
}

Then, use it like.

postToURL("http://example.com/","q","a");

But I would just leave out the function and just do.

   document.getElementById('donaldduck').value = "a";
   document.getElementById("ninja").submit();

Finally, the style decision goes in the ccs file.

.ninja{ 
  dislplay:none;
}

Personally I think forms should be addressed by name but that is not important right now.

share|improve this answer

Well, wish I had read all the other posts so I didn't lose time creating this from Rakesh Pai's answer. Here's a recursive solution that works with arrays and objects. No dependency on jQuery.

function postToUrl(path, data, method) {

method = method || "post"; // Set method to post by default if not specified.

var form = document.createElement("form");
form.setAttribute("method", method);
form.setAttribute("action", path);

function constructElements(item, parentString) {
    for (var key in item) {
        if (item.hasOwnProperty(key) && item[key] != null) {
            if (Object.prototype.toString.call(item[key]) === '[object Array]') {
                for (var i = 0; i < item[key].length; i++) {
                    constructElements(item[key][i], parentString + key + "[" + i + "].");
                }
            } else if (Object.prototype.toString.call(item[key]) === '[object Object]') {
                constructElements(item[key], parentString + key + ".");
            } else {
                var hiddenField = document.createElement("input");
                hiddenField.setAttribute("type", "hidden");
                hiddenField.setAttribute("name", parentString + key);
                hiddenField.setAttribute("value", item[key]);
                form.appendChild(hiddenField);
            }
        }
    }
}

constructElements(data, "");

document.body.appendChild(form);
form.submit();
}
share|improve this answer

I'd go down the Ajax route as others suggested with something like:

var xmlHttpReq = false;

var self = this;
// Mozilla/Safari
if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
    self.xmlHttpReq = new XMLHttpRequest();
}
// IE
else if (window.ActiveXObject) {
    self.xmlHttpReq = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
}

self.xmlHttpReq.open("POST", "YourPageHere.asp", true);
self.xmlHttpReq.setRequestHeader('Content-Type', 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded; charset=UTF-8');

self.xmlHttpReq.setRequestHeader("Content-length", QueryString.length);



self.xmlHttpReq.send("?YourQueryString=Value");
share|improve this answer

The Prototype library includes a Hashtable object, with a ".toQueryString()" method, which allows you to easily turn a JavaScript object/structure into a query-string style string. Since the post requires the "body" of the request to be a query-string formatted string, this allows your Ajax request to work properly as a post. Here's an example using Prototype:

$req = new Ajax.Request("http://foo.com/bar.php",{
    method: 'post',
    parameters: $H({
        name: 'Diodeus',
        question: 'JavaScript posts a request like a form request',
        ...
    }).toQueryString();
};
share|improve this answer

You could make an AJAX call (likely using a library such as using Prototype.js or JQuery). AJAX can handle both GET and POST options.

share|improve this answer
3  
Using XMLHttpRequest wouldn't direct the browser to another page. –  insin Sep 25 '08 at 15:35

This is like Alan's option 2 (above). How to instantiate the httpobj is left as an excercise.

httpobj.open("POST", url, true);
httpobj.setRequestHeader('Content-Type','application/x-www-form-urlencoded; charset=UTF-8');
httpobj.onreadystatechange=handler;
httpobj.send(post);
share|improve this answer

This is based on beauSD's code using jQuery. It is improved so it works recursively on objects.

function post(url, params, urlEncoded, newWindow) {
    var form = $('<form />').hide();
    form.attr('action', url)
        .attr('method', 'POST')
        .attr('enctype', urlEncoded ? 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded' : 'multipart/form-data');
    if(newWindow) form.attr('target', '_blank');

    function addParam(name, value, parent) {
        var fullname = (parent.length > 0 ? (parent + '[' + name + ']') : name);
        if(value instanceof Object) {
            for(var i in value) {
                addParam(i, value[i], fullname);
            }
        }
        else $('<input type="hidden" />').attr({name: fullname, value: value}).appendTo(form);
    };

    addParam('', params, '');

    $('body').append(form);
    form.submit();
}
share|improve this answer

You could dynamically add the form using DHTML and then submit.

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You could use a library like jQuery and its $.post method.

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1  
Note that $.post is AJAX only. –  Bryan Larsen Mar 27 '12 at 12:49
document.getElementById("form1").submit();

It works perfect in my case.

you can use it in function also like,

function formSubmit()
{
     document.getElementById("frmUserList").submit();
} 

Using this you can post all the values of inputs.

share|improve this answer

The easiest way is using Ajax Post Request:

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: 'http://www.myrestserver.com/api',
    data: data,
    success: success,
    dataType: dataType
    });

where:

  • data is an object
  • dataType is the data expected by the server (xml, json, script, text, html)
  • url is the address of your RESt server or any function on the server side that accept the HTTP-POST.

Then in the success handler redirect the browser with something like window.location.

share|improve this answer
1  
You didn't mention that the approach you offer is based on the jQuery JavaScript library. –  DavidRR Dec 15 '13 at 1:32
1  
you've also missed the point of the question - he wants to 'direct a browser to a different page', not make an ajax request. –  Francis Apr 3 at 0:21

protected by Andrew Whitaker May 29 '12 at 19:11

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