Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i'm a newbie to java..i'm having difficulty in understanding generics. with what i understood i wrote the following demo program to understand Generics but there are errors..help required.

class GenDemoClass <I,S> 
{
    private S info;
    public GenDemoClass(S str)
    {
        info = str;
    }
    public void displaySolidRect(I length,I width)
    {
        I tempLength = length;
        System.out.println();
        while(length > 0)
        {
            System.out.print("          ");
            for(int i = 0 ; i < width; i++)
            {
                System.out.print("*");
            }
            System.out.println();
            length--;
        }
        info = "A Rectangle of Length = " + tempLength.toString() + " and Width = " + width.toString() + " was drawn;";     
    }

    public void displayInfo()
    {
        System.out.println(info);
    }
}

public class GenDemo
{
    public static void main(String Ar[])
    {
        GenDemoClass<Integer,String> GDC = new GenDemoClass<Integer,String>("Initailize");
        GDC.displaySolidRect(20,30);
        GDC.displayInfo();
    }
}

if i replace type variables I and S with Integer and String in the GenDemoClass then code seems to work.. the errors are

error: bad operand types for binary operator '>'
                while(length > 0)
                             ^
  first type:  I
  second type: int
  where I is a type-variable:
    I extends Object declared in class GenDemoClass
share|improve this question
1  
you cannot compare numbers and I which can be pretty much anything. Consider what would happen if you'd declare GenDemoClass<String, String> –  Pablo Fernandez Nov 15 '12 at 6:39
    
yes i had considered that but i was trying a demo..i assumed only passing Integer..so according to that assumption i was thinking on the lines of I being a placeholder for Integer and hence went further with the coding..if this would work then my assumption would be right so..thanks for the response.. –  Koushik Nov 15 '12 at 7:28
    
if you already solved the issue, you may wanna accept @michaels answer. –  Pablo Fernandez Nov 15 '12 at 9:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that most objects do not work with the > operator.

If you declare that your type I must be a subtype of Number, then you can convert the instance of type I to an int primitive in the comparison. For instance

class GenDemoClass <I extends Number,S> 
{


public void displaySolidRect(I length,I width)
    {
        I tempLength = length;
        System.out.println();
        while(length.intValue() > 0)
        {

        }

At this point you're sunk because you cannot modify the length value like you want to - it's immutable. You can use a plain int for this purpose.

public void displaySolidRect(I length,I width)
    {
        int intLength = length.intValue();
        int intHeight = width.intValue();
        System.out.println();
        while(intLength > 0)
        {
           // iterate as you normally would, decrementing the int primitives
        }

In my opinion this is not an appropriate use of generics, as you don't gain anything over using the primitive integer type.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the response..yeah this is just a demo program to understand Generics so did not give heed to the programs usefulness..also i'm having problems with the second type too i.e when i pass the String type...should i extend String class for the second type?? –  Koushik Nov 15 '12 at 7:23
    
Sure you can say S extends String. But really why even use a generic for S in that case? –  I82Much Nov 15 '12 at 23:52

What happens if you pass something that isn't an Integer in to the I length file? Right now you're not saying that it should be any specific type, so if you were to pass in, say, a String, what would happen on this line?

while(length > 0)

Here you're assuming length is an integer, when you very clearly defined it generically as an I.

share|improve this answer
    
yes this thought crossed my mind at the very begining but i was more involved in solving the other problem first..thanks for the response –  Koushik Nov 15 '12 at 7:15

You should check instanceof before use

if (I instanceof Integer){ 
   // code goes here

}
share|improve this answer
    
surely will do..thanks for the response –  Koushik Nov 15 '12 at 7:31

The > op is not valid for an arbitrary class I.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.