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If I use git notes --ref=$REF edit $COMMIT,original message is:

Notes (xxx):

#NEW

path/to/file1: your message

path/to/file2: your message

#TEST

path/to/file3: your message

then the message becomes

Notes (xxx):

path/to/file1: your message

path/to/file2: your message

path/to/file3: your message

How to avoid that? I want to keep "#".

share|improve this question
    
@seb No. git notes is a different command than git commit, and takes different options. It doesn't appear to have a --cleanup option like git commit does. – Brian Campbell Nov 15 '12 at 7:58
    
Did anyone who voted to close this actually read the comments or the answer? This question is about the git notes command, not the git commit command, and they take different arguments, so that question is not relevant to answering this one. I cannot believe how many people blindly vote to close questions without even giving the least bit of thought. – Brian Campbell Nov 15 '12 at 16:22
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you take a look at builtin/notes.c in Git, you will see that it calls stripspace(&(msg->buf), 1); if it calls an editor, but stripspace(&(msg->buf), 0); if the message is passed in on the command line or via a file. stripspace(..., 1); means "skip comments", which causes it to strip out comments as well (lines starting with #), while stripspace(..., 0) means "don't skip comments", so they will be included.

So it looks like the best way to create notes including a # at the beginning of a line is to pass the note in via -m 'note contents' on the command line or -F filename to read the note in from a file.

This applies to the latest version of the code in git.git; I've tested with 1.8.0.

share|improve this answer
    
I use 1.7.10.1, and -m "contents" & -F file works well. Based on your comments, the only way I can change the notes with specific format is to use --force -m "content" or --force -F file? – Flyakite Nov 15 '12 at 8:36
    
@Flyakite Yes, in order to edit a note using the -m or -F flags, you need to use git notes add --force or -f. If you take a look at the implementation (or just try it out), you can use git notes edit -m or -F, but you will get a warning that tells you to use add -f. – Brian Campbell Nov 15 '12 at 8:54
    
OK, thank you:) – Flyakite Nov 15 '12 at 9:10

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