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if pair end with a space char, why result value contains one dot(.)? what does this dot(.) mean?

(cons 1 2 )
;Value 2: (1 . 2)

(car (cons 1 2 ))
;Value: 1

(cdr (cons 1 2 ))
;Value: 2

this one seems stupid, because pair only contain two element.

i just want to know why the first expression echo one dot in the result!

(cadr (cons 1 2 ))
;The object 2, passed as an argument to safe-car, is not a pair.
;To continue, call RESTART with an option number:
; (RESTART 1) => Return to read-eval-print level 1.

thanks!

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It has nothing to do with the space char. (cons 1 2 ) is the same as (cons 1 2) –  finnw Nov 15 '12 at 14:29
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

CONS constructs a pair. A pair of two things. It is written as (firstthing . secondthing).

If the second thing is an empty list, it is written as (firstthing). It is the same as (firstthing . ()).

Since cons constructs a cons, the result of (cons 1 2) is (1 . 2).

(cadr (cons 1 2)) is an error. It is (car (cdr (cons 1 2)). (cdr (cons 1 2) is 2. Now (car 2) is wrong. You can't take the car of 2. 2 is a number, not a cons.

If you want to create a list, which is made of cons cells or the empty list, then use the function list.

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thanks, but i want to know why there is a dot. –  ray Nov 15 '12 at 9:01
2  
@ray: A pair of two things. It is written as (firstthing . secondthing). That's the definition. That's why it is there. It could be written differently, but that's how it is defined in Lisp even before the dinosaurs walked on this planet. ;-) –  Rainer Joswig Nov 15 '12 at 12:12
    
sorry,i just start learning SICP, now i finally know that the dot is just a way of representing cons.whatever, thanks a lot. –  ray Nov 19 '12 at 2:31
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The dot is not an "element" of the result, it is the way in which Scheme memorizes lists, i.e. as concatenated pairs.

For example, the list

(1 2 3)

is memorized in this form:

(1 . (2 . (3 . ())))
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thanks, i got it. –  ray Nov 15 '12 at 9:02
    
This is not accurate, Scheme, or any other lisp, doesn't memorize dots! It prints dots to represent conses, usually conses whose cdr is not null or another cons, but that may be configurable in your implementation. –  Paulo Madeira Nov 15 '12 at 10:13
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