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If I have a POST parameter of

d={"data": "<span>hello</span>"}

which is a JSON string and it works fine and request.POST.get('d') contains the full string. But if I change it to

d = {"data": "<span>hel;lo</span>"}
print (request.POST.get('d')) #prints '{"data": "<span>hel'

For some reason anything after a semicolon is cut off. I can confirm this is not Javascript doing this because I used to use the exact same javascript code to post to a PHP API which was able to retrieve the data. Since moving to Python and webapp2 I've had this issue.

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So what happens if you add \ before the ;? –  Rob Nov 15 '12 at 8:27
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Please show us how you're posting this parameter –  Steve Mayne Nov 15 '12 at 8:39
    
I am posting using jQuery's $.ajax with data set to a JavaScript hashtable. –  Michael Bates Nov 15 '12 at 8:50
2  
So show us how you're doing it. –  Daniel Roseman Nov 15 '12 at 9:01
    
$.ajax({ type: settings.method, async: true, url: url, data: JSON.stringify(settings.params), success: function() { //handler here } }); –  Michael Bates Nov 15 '12 at 9:31
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3 Answers 3

This depends on the Content-Type of the request. If content type is application/x-www-form-urlencoded then you need to urlencode the params. See first answer for a detailed explanation: application/x-www-form-urlencoded or multipart/form-data?

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This confuses me as to why I would need to do this. It worked fine when I was using a PHP API (with the exact same $.ajax() call). I'll try what you suggested though. –  Michael Bates Nov 15 '12 at 9:57
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Run your string through encodeURIComponent(). Then components that truncate would be encoded. Afterwards when retrieving the data you need to decode.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

In the end I used YAML instead of JSON. It seems to be more python 'friendly'.

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