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I have just started using Newtonsoft.Json (Json.net). In my first simple test, I ran into a problem when deserializing generic lists. In my code sample below I serialize an object, containing three types of simple integer lists (property, member var and array).

The resulting json looks fine (the lists are converted into json-arrays). However, when I deserialize the json back to a new object of the same type, all list items are duplicated, expect for the array. I've illustrated that by serializing it a second time.

From searching around, I've read that there may be a "private" backing field to the lists that the deserializer also fills.

So my question is: Is there a (preferably simple) way to avoid duplicate items in following case?

Code

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using Newtonsoft.Json;

namespace JsonSerializeExample
{
    public class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            var data = new SomeData();
            var json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(data);
            Console.WriteLine("First : {0}", json);
            var data2 = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<SomeData>(json);
            var json2 = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(data2);
            Console.WriteLine("Second: {0}", json2);
        }
    }

    public class SomeData
    {
        public string SimpleField;
        public int[] IntArray;
        public IList<int> IntListProperty { get; set; }
        public IList<int> IntListMember;

        public SomeData()
        {
            SimpleField = "Some data";
            IntArray = new[] { 7, 8, 9 };
            IntListProperty = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 };
            IntListMember = new List<int> { 4, 5, 6 };
        }
    }
}

Resulting output

First : {"SimpleField":"Some data","IntArray":[7,8,9],"IntListMember":[4,5,6],"IntListProperty":[1,2,3]}
Second: {"SimpleField":"Some data","IntArray":[7,8,9],"IntListMember":[4,5,6,4,5,6],"IntListProperty":[1,2,3,1,2,3]}

There may be some overlap here with Json.Net duplicates private list items. However, I think my problem is even simpler, and I still haven't figured it out.

share|improve this question
    
My example was broken, as the contructor populated the lists. Duh! –  Kristian Vinther Nov 15 '12 at 9:18
    

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

That is because you are adding items in the constructor. A common approach in deserializers when processing a list is basically:

  • read the list via the getter
    • if the list is null: create a new list and assign via the property setter, if one
  • deserialize each item in turn, and append (Add) to the list

this is because most list members don't have setters, i.e.

public List<Foo> Items {get {...}} // <=== no set

Contrast to arrays, which must have a setter to be useful; hence the approach is usually:

  • deserialize each item in turn, and append (Add) to a temporary list
  • convert the list to an array (ToArray), and assign via the setter

Some serializers give you options to control this behavior (others don't); and some serializers give you the ability to bypass the constructor completely (others don't).

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I saw my mistake the second I pressed post :D. But thanks for your answer! –  Kristian Vinther Nov 15 '12 at 9:25
    
My example was broken, as the contructor populated the lists. Duh! –  Kristian Vinther Sep 11 at 19:51

I encountered a similar issue with a different root cause. I was serializing and deserializing a class that looked like this:

public class Appointment
{
    public List<AppointmentRevision> Revisions { get; set; }

    public AppointmentRevision CurrentRevision
    {
        get { return Revision.LastOrDefault(); }
    }

    public Appointment()
    {
        Revisions = new List<AppointmentRevision>();
    }
}

public class AppointmentRevision
{
    public List<Attendee> Attendees { get; set; }
}

When I serialized this, CurrentRevision was being serialized too. I'm not sure how, but when it was deserializing it was correctly keeping a single instance of the AppointmentRevision but creating duplicates in the Attendees list. The solution was to use the JsonIgnore attribute on the CurrentRevision property.

public class Appointment
{
    public List<AppointmentRevision> Revisions { get; set; }

    [JsonIgnore]   
    public AppointmentRevision CurrentRevision
    {
        get { return Revision.LastOrDefault(); }
    }

    public Appointment()
    {
        Revisions = new List<AppointmentRevision>();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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