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how could I make a legend representing all the curves that are plotted in my graph ? Presently, an automatic legend is generated for the first layer (based on the "colour" aesthetic), but the other layer (the black curve representing the density of "price" variable across all observations) in not contained in this legend.

I conceive that my question comes certainly from an incomplete understanding of the concepts behing ggplot package.

ggplot(diamonds) + 
  geom_density(aes(x = price, y = ..density.., colour = cut)) +
  geom_density(aes(x = price,y = ..density..))

enter image description here

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The principle in ggplot2 is that each aesthetic gets mapped to a scale. So, if you want to include a layer in the colour scale, you need to map that layer to colour.

Like this:

ggplot(diamonds, aes(x=price)) + 
  geom_density(aes(colour = cut)) +
  geom_density(aes(colour="Overall"), size=1.5)

enter image description here


Note: You can take additional control over the colours by specifying a manual colour scale:

ggplot(diamonds, aes(x=price)) + 
  geom_density(aes(colour = cut)) +
  geom_density(aes(colour="Overall"), size=1.5) +
  scale_colour_manual(
    limits=c("Overall", levels(diamonds$cut)),
    values=c("black", 2:6)
    )

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for explanations and simplifications of my code. I still have some difficulties when using scale_colour_manual to make the 'Overall' curve black, and have the 'Overall' label as upper label in the legend. –  fstevens Nov 15 '12 at 11:05
    
I added additional code and plot –  Andrie Nov 15 '12 at 11:39
    
Thanks, it is perfect ! –  fstevens Nov 15 '12 at 12:58

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