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I have a static class with method:

public static class FooUtilities
{
   public static FooStruct[] GetFooBar(int foo)
   {
      var fooStruct = new FooStruct[];
      // Connect to SOAP API, collect data to put in fooStruct
      ...
      return fooStruct;
   }
}

Now I want to use the result of GetFooBar(int foo) as an argument to another method that uses the results of this method to create new fooItem items, something like:

public static FooItem CreateFooItem(fooResult = GetFooBar(int foo))
{
   var fooItem = new FooItem(fooResult[0].value, fooResult[1].value,fooResult[2].value);
   ...
   return fooItem;
}

The way I do it now is to write this:

public static FooItem CreateFooItem(FooStruct[] fooResult)
{
   var fooItem = new FooItem(fooResult[0].value, fooResult[1].value,fooResult[2].value);
   ...
   return fooItem;
}

This works, but then I have to call the method like:

FooItem myItem = FooUtilities.CreateFooItem(FooUtilities.GetFooBar(12321));

What I'd like is to be able to call:

FooItem myItem = FooUtilities.CreateFooItem();

And have the argument included implicitly when this method is called.

Is this possible?

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Thanks for your answers! I'll probably end up re-designing the structure of this part of the application, because it's beginning to look pretty dirty... Now I know that the specification prohibits this, so I'll try to make a new version that is "spec compliant"! ;-) –  user1712937 Nov 15 '12 at 13:09
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't do this. From the spec:

A default value must be one of the following types of expressions:

  • a constant expression;

  • an expression of the form new ValType(), where ValType is a value type, such as an enum or a struct;

  • an expression of the form default(ValType), where ValType is a value type.

If you'd tried your CreateFooItem(fooResult = GetFooBar(int foo)) example, you'd have got the compiler error "Default parameter value for 'fooResult' must be a compile-time constant" which is a shorter version of the above.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes. That is correct. –  user1712937 Nov 15 '12 at 12:57
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No, you can only use values that can represented as constant literal values. You can, however, usually make null the default value (switching to Nullable<T> if the parameter is a non-nullable struct), and apply the default manually:

public static FooStruct[] GetFooBar(int? foo = null)
{
   int fooVal = foo ?? SomeMethod({some args here});
   // ... use fooVal from now on
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm... Interesting! I'll look into this later. Haven't gotten my head around the whole "nullable types" concept yet... –  user1712937 Nov 15 '12 at 12:59
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You can't do it by specifying a default parameter value (see @Rawling's answer), but you could create a zero-parameter overload that calls the first:

public static FooItem CreateFooItem()
{
    return CreateFooItem(GetFooBar(12321))
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah... Off course! Why didn't I think of that? But the argument will constantly change though, so I have to find a way out of that as well... But I'm going to call this in a loop of some kind, so I'll figure it out! But It's probably going to get so dirty that I'll end up changing the structure all together to make it more "Spec Correct", instead of trying to fool the CLR in all sorts of ways... ;-) –  user1712937 Nov 15 '12 at 13:06
    
Depending on what you want, you can also just pass the integer id too: public static FooItem FromFooBarId(int fooBarId) {return CreateFooItem(GetFooBar(fooBarId));} –  lc. Nov 16 '12 at 0:42
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No, the default parameter value needs to be a compile time constant. But you can do this:

public static FooItem CreateFooItem(FooStruct[] fooResult = null)
{
    if(fooResult==null)
    { 
        fooResult = FooUtilities.GetFooBar(12321);
    }
    ...
}

If GetFooBar will produce the same default value everytime, optionally, you can "save" that default value. This might improve performance depending on the use case:

private FooStruct[] defaultValue = null;
public static FooItem CreateFooItem(FooStruct[] fooResult = null)
{
    if(fooResult==null)
    { 
        fooResult = defaultValue ?? defaultValue = FooUtilities.GetFooBar(12321);
    }
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that's really dirty! But a workaround nevertheless! –  user1712937 Nov 15 '12 at 13:01
    
@cseder it's not dirty at all. If you want to be able to have an optional parameter and give it a dynamic (non-constant) default value, then this is the best you can do. Though I will shortly update my answer to add a small improvement... –  Eren Ersönmez Nov 15 '12 at 13:09
    
Ok! I'm waiting in excitement! –  user1712937 Nov 15 '12 at 13:13
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