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Currently I have a pandas DataFrame like this:

 ID                    A1      A2       A3       B1       B2       B3
 Ku8QhfS0n_hIOABXuE    6.343   6.304    6.410    6.287    6.403    6.279
 fqPEquJRRlSVSfL.8A    6.752   6.681    6.680    6.677    6.525    6.739
 ckiehnugOno9d7vf1Q    6.297   6.248    6.524    6.382    6.316    6.453
 x57Vw5B5Fbt5JUnQkI    6.268   6.451    6.379    6.371    6.458    6.333

This DataFrame is used with a statistic which then requires a permutation test (EDIT: to be precise, random permutation). The indices of each column need to be shuffled (sampled) 100 times. To give an idea of the size, the number of rows can be around 50,000.

EDIT: The permutation is along the rows, i.e. shuffle the index for each column.

The biggest issue here is one of performance. I want to permute things in a fast way.

An example I had in mind was:

import random
import joblib

def permutation(dataframe):
    return dataframe.apply(random.sample, axis=1, k=len(dataframe))

permute = joblib.delayed(permutation)
pool = joblib.Parallel(n_jobs=-2) # all cores minus 1
result = pool(permute(dataframe) for item in range(100))

The issue here is that by doing this, the test is not stable: apparently the permutation works, but it is not as "random" as it would without being done in parallel, and thus there's a loss of stability in the results when I use the permuted data in follow-up calculations.

So my only "solution" was to precalculate all indices for all columns prior to doing the paralel code, which slows things down considerably.

My questions are:

  1. Is there a more efficient way to do this permutation? (not necessarily parallel)
  2. Is the parallel approach (using multiple processes, not threads) feasible?

EDIT: To make things clearer, here's what should happen for example to column A1 after one shuffling:

Ku8QhfS0n_hIOABXuE    6.268   
fqPEquJRRlSVSfL.8A    6.343
ckiehnugOno9d7vf1Q    6.752
x57Vw5B5Fbt5JUnQk     6.297

(i.e. the row values were moving around).

EDIT2: Here's what I'm using now:

def _generate_indices(indices, columns, nperm):

    random.seed(1234567890)
    num_genes = indices.size

    for item in range(nperm):

        permuted = pandas.DataFrame(
            {column: random.sample(genes, num_genes) for column in columns},
             index=range(genes.size)
        )

        yield permuted

(in short, building a DataFrame of resampled indices for each column)

And later on (yes, I know it's pretty ugly):

 # Data is the original DataFrame
 # Indices one of the results of that generator

 permuted = dict()

 for column in data.columns:

    value = data[column]
    permuted[column] = value[indices[column].values].values

 permuted_table = pandas.DataFrame(permuted, index=data.index)
share|improve this question
    
Hi, to clarify: Do you need to create permutations for each line? Permutations of the A1,A2,A3,B1,B2,B3 members? –  andrefsp Nov 15 '12 at 11:38
    
Right, I'll edit the question to clarify. –  Einar Nov 15 '12 at 11:45
    
It would be helpful to use a very simple example... I was also confused. –  Andy Hayden Nov 15 '12 at 11:46
    
Have you tried to have a look on itertools.permutations ? docs.python.org/2/library/itertools.html#itertools.permutations And where is your testing point? Is it tested for each line, or is the test focus on the whole dataframe? –  andrefsp Nov 15 '12 at 11:56
    
After shuffling, each line will be subject to the algorithm (I use pandas' tools to do that quickly). –  Einar Nov 15 '12 at 13:33

1 Answer 1

How about this:

In [1]: import numpy as np; import pandas as pd

In [2]: df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(50000, 10))

In [3]: def shuffle(df, n):
   ....:     for i in n:
   ....:         np.random.shuffle(df.values)
   ....:     return df


In [4]: df.head()
Out[4]:
          0         1         2         3         4         5         6         7         8         9
0  0.329588 -0.513814 -1.267923  0.691889 -0.319635 -1.468145 -0.441789  0.004142 -0.362073 -0.555779
1  0.495670  2.460727  1.174324  1.115692  1.214057 -0.843138  0.217075  0.495385  1.568166  0.252299
2 -0.898075  0.994281 -0.281349 -0.104684 -1.686646  0.651502 -1.466679 -1.256705  1.354484  0.626840
3  1.158388 -1.227794 -0.462005 -1.790205  0.399956 -1.631035 -1.707944 -1.126572 -0.892759  1.396455
4 -0.049915  0.006599 -1.099983  0.775028 -0.694906 -1.376802 -0.152225  1.413212  0.050213 -0.209760

In [5]: shuffle(df, 1).head(5)
Out[5]:
          0         1         2         3         4         5         6         7         8         9
0  2.044131  0.072214 -0.304449  0.201148  1.462055  0.538476 -0.059249 -0.133299  2.925301  0.529678
1  0.036957  0.214003 -1.042905 -0.029864  1.616543  0.840719  0.104798 -0.766586 -0.723782 -0.088239
2 -0.025621  0.657951  1.132175 -0.815403  0.548210 -0.029291  0.575587  0.032481 -0.261873  0.010381
3  1.396024  0.859455 -1.514801  0.353378  1.790324  0.286164 -0.765518  1.363027 -0.868599 -0.082818
4 -0.026649 -0.090119 -2.289810 -0.701342 -0.116262 -0.674597 -0.580760 -0.895089 -0.663331  0.

In [6]: %timeit shuffle(df, 100)
Out[6]:
1 loops, best of 3: 14.4 s per loop

This does what you need it to. The only question is whether or not it is fast enough.

Update

Per the comments by @Einar I have changed my solution.

In[7]: def shuffle2(df, n):
           ind = df.index
           for i in range(n):
               sampler = np.random.permutation(df.shape[0])
               new_vals = df.take(sampler).values
               df = pd.DataFrame(new_vals, index=ind)
           return df

In [8]: df.head()
Out[8]: 
          0         1         2         3         4         5         6         7         8         9
0 -0.175006 -0.462306  0.565517 -0.309398  1.100570  0.656627  1.207535 -0.221079 -0.933068 -0.192759
1  0.388165  0.155480 -0.015188  0.868497  1.102662 -0.571818 -0.994005  0.600943  2.205520 -0.294121
2  0.281605 -1.637529  2.238149  0.987409 -1.979691 -0.040130  1.121140  1.190092 -0.118919  0.790367
3  1.054509  0.395444  1.239756 -0.439000  0.146727 -1.705972  0.627053 -0.547096 -0.818094 -0.056983
4  0.209031 -0.233167 -1.900261 -0.678022 -0.064092 -1.562976 -1.516468  0.512461  1.058758 -0.206019

In [9]: shuffle2(df, 1).head()
Out[9]: 
          0         1         2         3         4         5         6         7         8         9
0  0.054355  0.129432 -0.805284 -1.713622 -0.610555 -0.874039 -0.840880  0.593901  0.182513 -1.981521
1  0.624562  1.097495 -0.428710 -0.133220  0.675428  0.892044  0.752593 -0.702470  0.272386 -0.193440
2  0.763551 -0.505923  0.206675  0.561456  0.441514 -0.743498 -1.462773 -0.061210 -0.435449 -2.677681
3  1.149586 -0.003552  2.496176 -0.089767  0.246546 -1.333184  0.524872 -0.527519  0.492978 -0.829365
4 -1.893188  0.728737  0.361983 -0.188709 -0.809291  2.093554  0.396242  0.402482  1.884082  1.373781

In [10]: timeit shuffle2(df, 100)
1 loops, best of 3: 2.47 s per loop
share|improve this answer
    
I'll check tomorrow and report back. –  Einar Nov 15 '12 at 20:19
    
I noticed this shuffles around the values, but one can do things quickly using just the index. –  Einar Nov 16 '12 at 8:46
    
Oh ok I thought I saw in your example that the index wasn't moving, but the values associated with the index were. At least that is what I see from the first code block in the question when compared to the last one. –  spencerlyon2 Nov 16 '12 at 14:39
    
Shuffling the index and taking the values for the specific column, then reindexing the original column is a bit faster than doing the whole DataFrame at once. –  Einar Nov 16 '12 at 17:04
    
Does the updated answer do what you were thinking? –  spencerlyon2 Nov 16 '12 at 18:20

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