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I have a class which uses a Timer. This class implements IDispose. I would like to wait in the Dispose method until the timer will not fire again.

I implement it like this:

private void TimerElapsed(object state)
{
    // do not execute the callback if one callback is still executing
    if (Interlocked.Exchange(ref _timerIsExecuting, 1) == 1) 
        return;

    try
    {
        _callback();
    }
    finally
    {
        Interlocked.Exchange(ref _timerIsExecuting, 0);
    }
}

public void Dispose()
{
    if (Interlocked.Exchange(ref _isDisposing, 1) == 1)
        return;

    _timer.Dispose();

    // wait until the callback is not executing anymore, if it was
    while (_timerIsExecuting == 0) 
    { }

    _callback = null;
}

Is this implementation correct? I think it mainly depends on the question if _timerIsExecuting == 0 is an atomic operation. Or would I have to use a WaitHandle. For me it seems it would make the code unnecessarily complicated...

I am not an expert in multi-threading, so would be happy about any advice.

share|improve this question
    
I am developing an ASP.NET application. The timer is disposed on the call of Dispose of the HttpApplication. The reason: A callback could access the logging system. So i have to assure the before disposing the logging system the timer is disposed. –  SACO Nov 15 '12 at 11:29
    
@LMB Surely if a method has an IDisposable you dispose of it. Yes the GC can clean up, but if this is sufficient and efficient why have an IDisposable? –  M Afifi Nov 15 '12 at 12:33
    
@MAfifi For when you use unmannaged resources. –  LMB Nov 15 '12 at 12:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Unless you have a reason not to use System.Threading.Timer This has a Dispose method with a wait handle

And you can do something like,

private readonly Timer Timer;
private readonly ManualResetEvent TimerDisposed;
public Constructor()
{
    Timer = ....;
    TimerDisposed = new ManualResetEvent(false);
}

public void Dispose()
{
    Timer.Dispose(TimerDisposed);
    TimerDisposed.WaitOne();
    TimerDisposed.Dispose();
}
share|improve this answer

Why you need to dispose the Timer manually? Isn't there any other solution. As a rule of thumb, you're better leaving this job to GAC. – LMB 56 mins ago

I am developing an ASP.NET application. The timer is disposed on the call of Dispose of the HttpApplication. The reason: A callback could access the logging system. So i have to assure the before disposing the logging system the timer is disposed. – SACO 50 mins ago

It looks like you have a Producer/Consumer pattern, using the timer as Porducer.

What I'd do in this case, would be to create a ConcurrentQueue() and make the timer enqueue jobs to the queue. And then, use another safe thread to read and execute the jobs.

This would prevent a job from overlapping another, which seems to be a requirement in your code, and also solve the timer disposing problem, since you could yourQueue == null before adding jobs.

This is the best design.

Another simple, but not robust, solution, is running the callbacks in a try block. I don't recommend to dispose the Timer manually.

share|improve this answer
    
Things like timers are very hard for the GC to handle. The problem is that if e.g. a timer event serves only to do something to some object "George" every second, the timer will be useful as long as anyone is interested in George, and will cease to be useful once all references to George by potentially-interested entities are abandoned. One may be able to handle the situation by having a timer hold a WeakReference to George, and dispose itself if the weak reference dies; such an approach may use the GC, but is hardly "leaving the job to the GC". –  supercat May 3 '13 at 15:18

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