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Possible Duplicate:
Printf example in bash does not create a newline

I have a sample script "array-test.sh" which aggregates three functions into one array:

[user@host ~]$ cat array-test.sh 
#!/usr/bin/env bash

function1() {
   printf '%s\n\n\n' "cat" 
}

function2() {
   printf '%s\n\n\n' "dog" 
}

function3() {
   printf '%s\n\n\n' "mouse" 
}

for function in\
    function1\
    function2\
    function3; do
    array[$((index++))]=$($function)
done

echo "${array[@]}"
[user@host ~]$ ./array-test.sh 
cat dog mouse
[user@host ~]$ 

However, newline characters are missing. What causes such behavior?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Álvaro G. Vicario, DarkCthulhu, Donal Fellows, Jamey Sharp, Emil Vikström Nov 15 '12 at 18:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
I believe that $() behaves like the backtick operator. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Nov 15 '12 at 11:37
    
why did you post this complicated code? you can reproduce the problem with echo "$(function1)" –  Karoly Horvath Nov 15 '12 at 11:46
    
@KarolyHorvath: Because that's the essence of the problem, which is usually the most difficult thing to get to. The fact that you (claim) to see it instantly only proves that you are more accustomed to bash's quirks than the OP is. Why don't you show off your superiority by giving an answer, rather than a questionable comment? –  Rody Oldenhuis Nov 15 '12 at 11:50
    
@Rody Oldenhuis: please mind your manners, you just posted a rude comment. I don't think I asked anything special. Here at SO we expect people to come up with minimalistic examples. I think it's natural to check var=$(function) and from there it's the next step to directly use it with echo.. –  Karoly Horvath Nov 15 '12 at 13:21
    
@KarolyHorvath: Please don't feel offended; I just pointed out that to you that realization comes natural, but to the OP it might not. He probably reduced an enormous but non-functional chunk of code to the lines above, which he thought was minimal. Turns out, it's not. I also pointed out that "here at SO" we appreciate people to give answers as actual answers, and use comments only to get more details about the question or to clarify something, not for snappy statements like the one you started off with. –  Rody Oldenhuis Nov 15 '12 at 13:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As indicated by ÁlvaroG.Vicario, backticks (and $()) remove trailing newlines. There's no escaping it, so if you must, you'll have to work around it:

#!/usr/bin/env bash    

function1() {
   printf '%s' "cat"
}

function2() {
   printf '%s' "dog"
}

function3() {
   printf '%s' "mouse"
}

for function in\
    function1\
    function2\
    function3; do
    array[$((index++))]=$($function)
done

# manually add three newlines here
array=("${array[@]/%/$'\n'$'\n'$'\n'}")

echo "${array[@]}"
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply! Could you explain how this technique is called: "${array[@]/%/$'\n'$'\n'$'\n'}"? Is this parameter expansion for arrays? –  Martin Nov 15 '12 at 13:21
    
@Martin - $'\n' => 0x0a character; '\n' => \n characters. It's a way to interpolate escape sequences as literal strings. –  amphetamachine Nov 15 '12 at 13:53
    
This should be "pattern substitution". Usage is ${parameter/pattern/string}. Am I correct that if <pattern> is "%", then <string> is trailed to the end of the <parameter>? –  Martin Nov 15 '12 at 14:55
    
@Martin: Yes. From man bash (Pattern substitution): "[...] If pattern begins with %, it must match at the end of the expanded value of parameter [...]." –  Rody Oldenhuis Nov 15 '12 at 15:01
    
@Rody: Thanks! However, why second and third array item have space character in front of them? I mean in the output, "dog" and "mouse" have a space character in front of them. Is there a way to avoid it? –  Martin Nov 15 '12 at 15:25

Another option: add a character (@ here) at the end of the string. The newlines in the middle of a string will be kept in $( ... ). Then, remove the character by parameter expansion:

#!/bin/bash
function1() {
   printf '%s\n\n\n@' "cat" 
}

function2() {
   printf '%s\n\n\n@' "dog" 
}

function3() {
   printf '%s\n\n\n@' "mouse" 
}

for function in\
    function1\
    function2\
    function3; do
    array[index++]=$($function)
    array[index]=${array[index]%@}
done

echo "${array[@]}"
share|improve this answer

It seems like the subshell expansion cuts newline characters, but only if they occur at the end. Here's a kludge:

function3() {
   printf '%s\n\n\n-' "mouse" 
}

foo=$(function3)
foo=${foo%-}
echo "$foo"
share|improve this answer
    
This is clever :) However, for some reason "dog" and "mouse" still have a space character in front of them. –  Martin Nov 15 '12 at 16:01
    
You need to add the '-' character to the end of your output strings within each function. But it could be any character, as long as you have it in ${foo%HERE}. –  amphetamachine Nov 15 '12 at 16:19

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