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I wonder whether memory for array member of a class be allocated in c++.
In my class, I defined array member like this:

class A
{
  public:
    B* B_array[1000];
}

and, in the constructor, I want to use it:

A::A()
{
  for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
  {
     B_array[i] = new B;//can i use B_array[0...999]???
  }
}
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You can use your array of pointers after you've newed all your pointers in the array. –  Tony The Lion Nov 15 '12 at 11:30
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
B* B_array[1000];

What you have is an array of 1000 pointers to the type B.

  for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
  {
       B_array[i] = new B;//can i use B_array[0...999]???
  }

Allocates memory to each pointer in the array, after this statement each pointer points to a memory on heap.

So yes you can use each of them, once this code is executed.

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Yes, the memory for 1000 pointers of B class instances will be allocated. You have defined an array B_array[1000] of B* objects. It's the same as int integerArray [1000]. You just store pointers in the array, not values. However you will need to initialize them to point to the actual objects on the heap.

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I wonder whether memory for array member of a class be allocated in c++

Yes, why not. If your doubt is about allocating an array the way you are doing, it is possible. If your doubt is about calling B's constructor while still being in A's constructor, then also there is absolutely no issues with that.

In general, however there are several things that I would take care in the code shown e.g. not hard coding the value 1000, checking for exception from new etc.. you get the idea.

And you should also be bothered about releasing the memory resource in the destructor of A explicitly.

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I think that the system may only allocate a pointer for the member. –  Rubby Nov 15 '12 at 11:43
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Yes, you can. When you enter the body of constructor, there are 1000 uninitialized pointers waiting for you to initialize them.

What you should do, though, is use std::vector<B>

class A
{
  public:
     std::vector<B> array;
}

A::A() : array(1000) {}

and be done with it. Vector allocates its elements dynamically.

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Yes you can. Memory for 1000 pointers will be allocated always. However those pointers will not be initialised unless you do that yourself (as you are in your contructor code).

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