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I am having strange behavior with a client server image transfer. Currently the server always stalls when it has read 32768 bytes out of the buffer, the total file size is 36556 bytes. The while loop does not end, yet it doesn't print any of the print statements inside of it, and there are no exceptions thrown. I have tried several different size byte buffers and even going larger than the image size does not solve the issue.

Client Code:

    private static void writePhoto(Socket socket) throws IOException {

    OutputStream outputStream = new   BufferedOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream());

    String file_path = "E:\\Eclipse\\Workspace\\DNI_PsuedoClient\\" +
            "src\\main\\resources\\BuckyBadger.jpg";
    try {
        InputStream stream = new FileInputStream(file_path);
        System.out.println(stream.available());
        try {
            byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
            int readData;
            int i = 1; 
            while((readData=stream.read(buffer))!=-1){
                System.out.println(readData + " " + i);
            outputStream.write(buffer,0,readData);
            i++;
            }
            System.out.println("done writing to buffer");
        }catch (IOException e) {
              System.err.println("File Error");
              e.printStackTrace();
              System.exit(-1);
        }finally {
            stream.close();
        }
    } finally {
    }
}

Server Code

    private static java.io.File createFile(Socket client) throws IOException {

    System.out.println("Starting to create file");
    InputStream stream = new BufferedInputStream(client.getInputStream());

    System.out.println("1");
    // Create file from the inputStream
    java.io.File Recieved_File = new java.io.File(thread_ID + ".jpg");
    System.out.println(thread_ID + ".jpg");
    System.out.println("2");

    try {
       OutputStream outputStream = new FileOutputStream(Recieved_File);
       System.out.println("3");

       try {
          byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
          System.out.println("4");
          int readData;
          int i = 1;

          while ((readData = stream.read(buffer)) != -1) {
              System.out.println("start");
              outputStream.write(buffer, 0, readData);
              System.out.println(readData + " " + i + " " + (i * readData));
              i++;
              System.out.println("end while loop");
          }
       } finally {
         System.out.println("5");
         outputStream.close();
         System.out.println("6");
         }
     } finally {
   }
   System.out.println("Created file");
   return Recieved_File;
   }

As you can see I have made several attempts using print statements in the Server code to try to figure out the issue. Any insight would be extremely helpful.

For further reference I have had the exact same server code working for an interaction with a Windows phone where the phone took a photo and uploaded it to the server. I am now changing the code to run on multiple threads and testing it in Java first with a java client that is simulating the interaction. The java client is attempting to send a photo stored on the drive to the server. The client appears to be working correctly as it puts the entire photo into the buffer.

I have written a protocol, here it is:

    public DNI_Protocol(Socket socket, String threadID) {
    client = socket;
    thread_ID = threadID;
     }

public String processInput(String theInput) {

String theOutput = null;
if (state == WAITING) {
  System.out.println(theInput);
  if (theInput.equals("Upload")) {
    state = UPLOAD_PHOTO;
    theOutput = "Send Photo";
  } else if (theInput == "View") {
    state = VIEW;
    theOutput = "Send Request";
  } else {
    theOutput = "Waiting";
  }
} else if (state == UPLOAD_PHOTO) {
  // if (theInput != "Sending Photo") {
  // TODO: Throw a state exception with a message
  // return "exit";
  // }
  setupDrive();
  try {
    Image_Handle = createFile(client);
    System.out.println("Uploading file");
    uploadedFile = Drive_Interface.uploadFile(false, Image_Handle, drive);
    System.out.println("file Uploaded");
    google_ID = uploadedFile.getId();
    System.out.println(google_ID);
    Image_Handle.delete(); // We are done with the file so we can delete it
    System.out.println("deleted file");
  } catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
  }
  theOutput = "Send Keywords";
  state = UPLOAD_KEYWORDS;
} else if (state == UPLOAD_KEYWORDS) {
  if (theInput != "Sending Keywords") {
    // TODO: Throw a state exception with a message
    return "exit";
  }
  // TODO: Add code to get keyword arraylist and upload information to
  // the database
  theOutput = "exit";
}
return theOutput;

}

share|improve this question
2  
What are you expecting to happen? Your code contains no way for the client to stop the server from continuing to wait for more data. So the server keeps waiting forever. (When you designed the protocol you used to communicate between these two programs, two questions you should have answered were "How will the client tell the server that it has the entire file?" and "How will the server know that it has the entire file?") Perhaps you meant to close the connection in the client? –  David Schwartz Nov 15 '12 at 12:18
    
Had you tried calling flush(), with all instances of Buffered related Streams ? As I am not so good with File Handling, hence just a small idea i can give, to look at. –  nIcE cOw Nov 15 '12 at 12:19
    
@GagandeepBali There's no explicit buffering, so the only buffering is the Nagle's algorithm, which doesn't introduce a long delay. –  Jan Dvorak Nov 15 '12 at 12:22
    
@DavidSchwartz There is no way for me to tell the server that it has the entire file as the server while loop never reaches the total file size. As my edit mentions this exact same code worked previously when interacting with a Windows Phone application and now is giving me trouble when attempting to interact with a java client. –  JME Nov 15 '12 at 12:27
1  
(i * readData) is wrong for a total. You need to keep a running total of the bytes as each read could return a different amount. –  Brian White Nov 15 '12 at 12:45

2 Answers 2

Your server code says this:

      while ((readData = stream.read(buffer)) != -1) {
          System.out.println("start");
          outputStream.write(buffer, 0, readData);
          System.out.println(readData + " " + i + " " + (i * readData));
          i++;
          System.out.println("end while loop");
      }

This keeps reading from the socket until either the socket closes or the server gets an error, there are no other reasons read would return -1. Since neither of these conditions occur, the server stays in this while loop. You simply never wrote any code to handle the end of the file.

If the server knows it's going to read a particular number of bytes, it needs to break out of the while loop when it has read that number of bytes. If the client is going to tell the server that it has finished sending the file by closing the socket or shutting down one direction of the TCP connection, then the client needs code to do that. Otherwise, the server will wait forever.

share|improve this answer
    
And if the while loop kept running indefinitely I would be able to tell due to both the "start" and "end while loop" print statements repeating over and over again. This does not occur. I have added code for the server to expect the 36556 byte file size and move on after reaching this point. The thing is it never reaches this point it stops at 32768 bytes, as I have said repeatedly, and does nothing more. –  JME Nov 15 '12 at 13:21
    
To iterate on my point further. If I change the byte array size to 4096, and have the code set to expect 36556 bytes of data, the while loop still stalls at 32768 bytes. What I am trying to explain is that the code does not crash, but it also does not give me any repeated statements indicative of an infinite loop. Your solution solves for an infinite loop which I have no indication of. –  JME Nov 15 '12 at 13:25
    
It doesn't exit the loop, what more do you need? –  David Schwartz Nov 15 '12 at 13:31
up vote 0 down vote accepted
      int sum = 0; 
      while ((readData = stream.read(buffer)) != -1, && sum < 36556) {
      System.out.println("start");
      outputStream.write(buffer, 0, readData);
      System.out.println(readData + " " + i + " " + (i * readData));
      i++;
      sum = sum + readData;
      System.out.println("end while loop");
  }

This code stalls in the exact same position at 32768 bytes;

share|improve this answer
    
Most likely, some of the 36,556 bytes were already read by previous code, so this code waits forever. You have to make sure the code that reads stuff before this doesn't read even a single extra byte of data -- otherwise this code will wait forever for it. Log the first few bytes received by this loop and I bet you'll find they're a ways into the file. –  David Schwartz Nov 15 '12 at 13:32

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