Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to draw a polygon using GDI. This code works:

type
  TPolygon: Array[0..2] of TPoint;

var 
  ACanvas: TGPGraphics;
  MyBrush: TGPLinearGradientBrush;

...

procedure DrawPolygon;
var
  Polygon: TPolygon;
begin
  Polygon[0].X := 1;
  Polygon[0].Y := 5;
  Polygon[1].X := 10;
  Polygon[1].Y := 15;
  Polygon[2].X := 1;
  Polygon[2].Y := 5;

  ACanvas.FillPolygon(MyBrush, PGPPoint(@Polygon), length(Polygon));
end;

...

This code produces a GDI Value Overflow error:

type
  TPolygon: Array of TPoint;

var 
  ACanvas: TGPGraphics;
  MyBrush: TGPLinearGradientBrush;

...

procedure DrawPolygon;
var
  Polygon: TPolygon;
begin
  SetLength(Polygon, 3);

  Polygon[0].X := 1;
  Polygon[0].Y := 5;
  Polygon[1].X := 10;
  Polygon[1].Y := 15;
  Polygon[2].X := 1;
  Polygon[2].Y := 5;

  ACanvas.FillPolygon(MyBrush, PGPPoint(@Polygon), length(Polygon));
end;

...

The only difference is that one point array is dynamic, the other is static. Obviously the underlying memory values are different, but in what way?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your code is invalid. (First, there is no FillPolygon in TCanvas, and second, a polygon need at least three vertices. Also, there are some syntax errors, like a : instead of = at the const declaration.) I'd suggest the sample

Polygon[0].X := 1;
Polygon[0].Y := 1;
Polygon[1].X := 1;
Polygon[1].Y := 100;
Polygon[2].X := 100;
Polygon[2].Y := 1;

which is a nice triangle. Anyhow, while

Windows.Polygon(Canvas.Handle, Polygon, 3)

works for a static array, you have to do

Windows.Polygon(Canvas.Handle, Polygon[0], 3)

for a dynamic array. The reason is that a static array is stored 'in-place' in memory, that is, directly at @Polygon, just like a number (e.g., cardinal) is stored, or a ShortString, or a record of such simple types. On the contrary, if Polygon is a dynamic array, then it is really a pointer to the actual, variable-length, data (in much the same way a normal variable-length string works). That is, at @Polygon you only have a pointer, a NativeUInt. The actual data starts at this new address, which you can get by writing @Polygon[0].

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Andreas. My post doesn't state that Canvas is TCanvas. It's actually TGPGraphics. I'll edit the question to give it more clarity. –  norgepaul Nov 15 '12 at 13:16
1  
@norgepaul: I see. Well, the answer is pretty much the same, though. But surely you need at least three vertices even in this case? –  Andreas Rejbrand Nov 15 '12 at 13:19
    
Technically, a polygon does need to be enclosed. However, in this case 2 points just draw a straight line. I see your point however and I've updated the question :) –  norgepaul Nov 15 '12 at 13:24
    
Your answer is just what I was looking for. Thanks. –  norgepaul Nov 15 '12 at 13:25

A dynamic array is already a pointer, so just remove the @ operator when passing the dynamic array to FillPolygon():

ACanvas.FillPolygon(MyBrush, PGPPoint(Polygon), length(Polygon));

Alternatively, if you want to use a syntax that works for both static and dynamic arrays, do this instead:

ACanvas.FillPolygon(MyBrush, PGPPoint(@Polygon[0]), length(Polygon));
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.