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The following code is my implementation of the Singleton Pattern.

 #include <iostream>

template<class T>
class Uncopyable
{
protected:
    Uncopyable(){}
    ~Uncopyable(){}
private:
    Uncopyable(const Uncopyable<T>&);
    Uncopyable& operator=(const Uncopyable<T>&);
};

template <class T>
class Singleton : private Uncopyable<T>
{
public:
    static T* getInstancePtr()
    {
        return instance;
    }
protected:
    Singleton<T>()
    {
        if(instance == 0)
        {
            instance = new T();
        }
    };
    ~Singleton<T>()
    {

    };
private:
    static T* instance;
};
template<class T> T* Singleton<T>::instance = 0;

class Test : public Singleton<Test>
{
public:
    Test(){};
    ~Test(){};
    inline void test() const
    {
        std::cout << "Blah" << std::endl;
    }
private:
    friend class Singleton<Test>;
protected:
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Test* t = Test::getInstancePtr();
    Test* t2 = Test::getInstancePtr();

    t->test();
    t2->test();

    return 0;
}

It works in this form, however I am uncertain as to whether it really is correct due to the constructor and destructor of the Singleton being protected as opposed to being private. If I declare them as private the code will not compile as they are not accessible to the class. Is this implementation safe to use, or is there anything I can do to improve it to ensure only one instance will be created and used.

Thanks

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by John Dibling, WhozCraig, Linger, Matthieu M., Ash Burlaczenko Nov 15 '12 at 15:37

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2  
The Singleton pattern should be avoided at all costs!!! – Phorce Nov 15 '12 at 13:24
    
Why Uncopyable is a class template? – Nawaz Nov 15 '12 at 13:25
5  
@Phorce, that's very debatable. – SingerOfTheFall Nov 15 '12 at 13:26
1  
Well, it isn't thread safe for one, if(instance == 0) could be subject to race conditions. – juanchopanza Nov 15 '12 at 13:28
1  
@Phorce: "At all costs" is overstating a tiny bit. A very tiny bit. There could be legitimate use cases. But it should not be used in about 99.99% of the places where it's currently used, and most people should not even be considering it. Damn the GoF for even freaking mentioning it. – cHao Nov 15 '12 at 15:22
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are several things wrong with the code you've posted.

  1. The Uncopyable class doesn't need to be templated
  2. The Singleton class isn't thread safe
  3. Your Singleton instance is never deleted

I would re-implement your accessor as:

static T& GetInstance()
{
    static T instance;
    return instance;
}

Then make sure you call Singleton<T>::GetInstance() in the main thread of your application (during initialisation) to avoid any threading issues.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think you need instance to be static. – juanchopanza Nov 15 '12 at 13:30
1  
Surely you don't mean to return a new T object each time GetInstance is called? – mah Nov 15 '12 at 13:30
    
Oops. Thanks for spotting the deliberate typo... ;) – Mark Ingram Nov 15 '12 at 13:32
    
Thanks that getInstance method works nicely. Just a point however, what is so bad about the Uncopyable class being a template? Is it preference or just plain bad? – const_ref Nov 15 '12 at 13:38
    
It's not preference, or being bad, it's just unnecessary. You've created a templated class that uses a templated type T, and then you never use it! – Mark Ingram Nov 15 '12 at 13:40

That is most certainly an incorrect implementation of singleton. There are too many issues with that implementation.

In C++11, you can make use of std::call_once and std::once_flag to implement singleton pattern. Here is one example:

//CRTP base singleton class

template<typename TDerived>
class Singleton 
{
    static std::unique_ptr<TDerived> m_instance;
    static std::once_flag            m_once;

protected:     

    Singleton() {}

public:

    ~Singleton() { }

    static TDerived & GetInstance() 
    {
        std::call_once
        ( 
           Singleton::m_once, 
           [] (){ Singleton::m_instance.reset( new TDerived() ); }
        );
        return *m_instance;
    }
};

template<typename TDerived> 
std::unique_ptr<TDerived>  Singleton<TDerived>::m_instance;

template<typename TDerived> 
std::once_flag   Singleton<TDerived>::m_once;

Now you can derive from it as:

class Demo : public Singleton<Demo>
{
     public:
          void HelloWorld() { std::cout << "HelloWorld" << std::endl; }
};

//call HelloWorld() function through singleton instance!
DemoSingleton::GetInstance().HelloWorld();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I will look further into these features of C++11 – const_ref Nov 15 '12 at 13:44
    
How would you then use this Singleton class to create a the Test class as a singelton. Im am unfamiliar with lamdas etc, and would appreciate a small example of using this form of a singleton. – const_ref Nov 15 '12 at 14:07
1  
@Moore91: I've edited my answer. – Nawaz Nov 15 '12 at 15:18
    
Thanks a lot. I was close with what I had tried myself, but now I understand it much better. Cheers :) – const_ref Nov 15 '12 at 15:44

your destructor private will cause the compile error?cause when the process ends,the compile cannot call the private function so the object cannot be delete

share|improve this answer

No this is not a good implementation of the singleton pattern, it does not work! The only instance of Test in the example is NULL! The constructor is never called!

You need to change Singleton::getInstancePtr to:

public:
    static T* getInstancePtr()
    {
        if(instance == 0)
        {
            instance = new T();
        }
        return instance;
    }
protected:
   Singleton<T>() {};

The constructor for Test will now be called.

share|improve this answer

Usually singleton objects live for the lifetime of the program, so I do not implement them like that, because you use dynamic allocation, then someone must free it and you return a pointer to your singleton object, then you may accidentally delete it, so I will use something like this:

template< class T >
struct Singleton : Uncopyable<T> {
public:
    static T& get_instance() {
        static T res;
        use( res ); // make sure object initialized before used
        return res;
    }
private:
    static void use( T& ) {}
};
share|improve this answer

There is no correct implementation of the Singleton anti-pattern in C++.

The main issues with this attempt are:

  • The semantics are a very weird and error-prone; you must instantiate Singleton somewhere in order to create the instance. You example never creates the instance, and t->test() is erroneously calling a function via a null pointer.
  • Construction is not thread-safe; two instances could be created if two unsynchronised threads both instantiate Singleton.
  • If the instance is actually created, then it is leaked.

A less erroneous implementation might be more like this:

template <typename T>
T & singleton()
{
    static T instance;
    return instance;
}

but this still has issues: in particular, the instance may be destroyed before other static objects, which may attempt to access it in their destructors.

share|improve this answer
    
Though the 3rd point can be trivially fixed by deleting in destructor, it's still debatable as the singleton object remains for the lifetime and an OS will collect it when the program ends. – iammilind Nov 15 '12 at 13:34
    
@iammilind: Deleting it in the destructor would be a very bad idea, since there's nothing to stop multiple instances of Singleton all thinking they own the underlying instance. I agree that it's debatable whether (finite) resource leaks are a problem; but that's very much off topic. I just point it out as an issue that some people might be concerned about. – Mike Seymour Nov 15 '12 at 13:40

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