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I've a method which is making a huge calculation and then calls an intent as follows

public void sampleMethod(final Context cont)
{
 .
 .
 (huge calculation [50-80 lines])
 .
 .
Intent intent = new Intent(cont, TimesheetMain.class);
            finish();
            startActivity(intent);
}

This is present in Activity 'SampleActivity'. When I'm trying to access it through on object of Activity 'SampleActivity' from Activity 'B' as follows:

Context context = this;
SampleActivity sa = new SampleActivity();
sa.sampleMethod(context);

I'm getting a NullPointerException at the startActivity line of code while accessing it from Activity 'B'. I can't figure out where am i going wrong in here. Please help me out

EDIT 2

This seem to work when i added context to it like cont.startActivity(intent), but i need to know why shouldn't i use another class or another activity's function in a secondary class? Is the android framework is the reason? I've been doing this (without the intent part) for the past two months or so, i never faced any sudden force close issues in either emulator or in device(Nextbook professional 7 SE); Please explain it with a legit example

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2  
Manoj i would recommend you to get familiar with android development first.you can not simply create object of activity and that too for only sake of calling a function. –  Vipul Shah Nov 15 '12 at 13:28
    
Then how can i access a public function of another activity? –  Manoj Kumar Nov 15 '12 at 13:29
    
You don't. Place it onto a common class that both activities have access to (itself fraught with risks) or better, explain why you want to do this and look for another approach. Personally, I can't think of any whys. –  Simon Nov 15 '12 at 13:38
1  
By coincidence, earlier today stackoverflow.com/questions/13392929/… It's a different scenario but treating Activities as "black boxes" is the point. Please do edit your question and explain why. There is certainly a better way. –  Simon Nov 15 '12 at 13:41
1  
To answer your edit, Google for "Romain Guy don't pass contexts". If Romain says it, you'd better believe it ;) Last word from me. Just because you can doesn't mean you should. –  Simon Nov 15 '12 at 13:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

try the follwng updated code:

public void sampleMethod(final Activity cont)
{
Intent intent = new Intent(cont, TimesheetMain.class);
            cont.finish();
            cont.startActivity(intent);
}

also move this method to a util class and call it from activity and pass the activity reference as follows

class ActivityB extends Activity
{
.
.
.

Util.sampleMethod(this);
}
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Nice one mate; But ppl are saying that i shouldn't create an object of a class explicitly; will dig up on it and then accept your answer :) –  Manoj Kumar Nov 15 '12 at 13:34
    
@ManojKumar Starting it via an Intent is absolutely what you are supposed to do. SampleActivity sa = new SampleActivity(); is not. –  Simon Nov 15 '12 at 13:41
    
I'm able to use starActivity in this manner, but not startActivityForResult. Can you help me with that too? –  Manoj Kumar Nov 15 '12 at 13:41
    
people are right you should not create the object of activity thats why i have asked you to pass activity reference using this. What is the problem you are facing with startActivityForResult? –  Praful Bhatnagar Nov 15 '12 at 13:45
    
It says startActivityForResult(Intent,int) is not available for the type Context –  Manoj Kumar Nov 15 '12 at 13:57

You're not supposed to create explicit instances of activities by yourself as you're doing like this:

SampleActivity sa = new SampleActivity();

Please provide a better description for your problem and what you want to achieve with the outcome of this issue.

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Faria: Then how can i access a public function of another activity? –  Manoj Kumar Nov 15 '12 at 13:30
    
You shouldn't be willing to do this. Activities are loosely coupled components, they shouldn't be aware of the existance of each other. But if you really want to do it, make it static. –  Flávio Faria Nov 15 '12 at 13:53
    
Static? the function or the whole activity itself? –  Manoj Kumar Nov 15 '12 at 13:54
    
The method you're calling. –  Flávio Faria Nov 15 '12 at 13:59

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