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This is the code I have written, to test the working of wait() and notify(). Now I have a bunch of doubts.

class A extends Thread {
  public void run() {
    try {
      wait();
      for (int i = 1; i <= 5; i++) {
        System.out.println(i);
        sleep(500);
      }
    } catch (Exception e) {
    }
    System.out.println("End Of Thread");
  }
}

class ThreadWaitNotify {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    try {
      A t = new A();
      t.start();
      t.wait();
      t.notify();
      t.join();
      System.out.println("End Of Main");
    } catch (Exception e) {
    }
  }
}

My questions are:

  1. When I write t.wait() in main, the main does not execute further, and I am not able to resume it further. How to do that?
  2. Secondly I have written wait() in thread also, due to which it only prints "End Of Thread", not the loop? Even if I notify() from main or not...
  3. Now if I write notify() in main it does not complete execution. While on commenting that line it finishes execution and prints "End Of Main".
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3  
What do you know abut wait() and notify()? I'm not trying to sound nasty, but your questions make it look like your expectations of those methods are way off. What do you expect a call to wait() to do? –  Joachim Sauer Nov 15 '12 at 13:45
1  
And: never write empty catch blocks: you're actively hiding information that could help you find out the problem. Put at least an e.printStackTrace() in both catch-blocks. –  Joachim Sauer Nov 15 '12 at 13:51
2  
You should never call wait() or notify() an a thread. It won't do what you expect. When you perform a notify on a object, you should alter some state asscoiated with it, and when you perform a wait on an object, you should check the same state. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 15 '12 at 14:06
    
Joachim Sauer: according to me wait() leaves the cpu and unless notified does not ask for... so when i notify() it should resume...?? –  sid15g Nov 15 '12 at 14:08
    
@sid15g: that's basically right. So knowing that, if your main thread calls wait() and nothing else calls notify(), then why should the main thread ever continue? The important thing to realize that it's always the current thread that's waiting and it's waiting for someone to call notify() on the same object you called wait() on. Therefore calling those methods on a Thread object is confusing at best, because it doesn't actually do anything with that thread, but with the current thread instead. –  Joachim Sauer Nov 15 '12 at 14:10

1 Answer 1

My questions are:

When I write t.wait() in main, the main does not execute further, and I am not able to resume it further. How to do that?

The thread that is running main does not hold the lock on t when it calls t.wait(). As you'll see from the JavaDoc for wait():

Throws: IllegalMonitorStateException - if the current thread is not the owner of the object's monitor.

So your call to wait() is resulting in the IllegalMonitorStateException being thrown. Your empty catch block simply discards the error, which makes it difficult to debug. You can show the error using ex.printStackTrace(); or you can re-throw it as an unchecked exception:

    throw new RuntimeException(ex);

To fix the wait() call, you'd need to synchronize on t:

synchronized (t) {
    t.wait();
}

You'll also need to hold the same lock when you call notify().

Secondly I have written wait() in thread also, due to which it only prints "End Of Thread", not the loop? Even if I notify() from main or not...

Same thing is happening here, but in a different thread. The new thread that you create doesn't own the lock on t, so the wait() call throws an Exception. Again, you're discarding the exception, by not handling it correctly.

Now if I write notify() in main it does not complete execution. While on commenting that line it finishes execution and prints "End Of Main".

I assume you mean "commenting out the calls to wait() and notify()". This is expected. The run() method has finished, that is: it caught the IllegalMonitorStateException that was thrown and carried on to the end of the method. The join() method returns when the thread has finished executing. This happens almost immediately, because the wait() call throws an exception immediately.

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Thanks... My biggest mistake was i should not have written empty catch block... that could have solved my problem... –  sid15g Nov 15 '12 at 14:16
    
A similar gotcha (which isn't directly related to your question), is expecting catch (Exception ex) to catch anything that gets thrown. It doesn't, because it won't catch Error classes. If you ever find yourself confused about why a line in your code isn't executing, you might consider catch (Throwable t), at least while your investigating a problem. –  Martin Ellis Nov 15 '12 at 14:22
    
@MartinEllis: but then again, an Error that falls through usually get's dumped to System.out, so you'll usually see it. –  Joachim Sauer Nov 15 '12 at 15:16
    
@JoachimSauer Yep, if it's just a console app, it'll go to System.err. But in my experience, at least, there are still some badly behaved application servers and other 'containers' that will happily swallow them. And for some applications, you're watching logs, and not the terminal. –  Martin Ellis Nov 15 '12 at 15:22

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