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Let's say I have this enum:

[Flags]
enum Letters
{
     A = 1,
     B = 2,
     C = 4,
     AB = A | B,
     All = A | B | C,
}

To check if for example AB is set I can do this:

if((letter & Letters.AB) == Letters.AB)

Is there a simpler way to check if any of the flags of a combined flag constant are set than the following?

if((letter & Letters.A) == Letters.A || (letter & Letters.B) == Letters.B)

Could you for example swap the & with something?

Not too stable when it comes to binary stuff like this...

share|improve this question
    
Shouldn't all read 'All = A | B | C'? – Stevo3000 Aug 27 '09 at 9:56
2  
AB | C is equivalent to A | B | C because AB was defined as A | B before. – Daniel Brückner Aug 27 '09 at 10:00
    
@Daniel Brückner - It is equivalent, but it is less readable. Especially if the enum was expanded. – Stevo3000 Aug 27 '09 at 10:03
    
True. I can change it for better reading. – Svish Aug 27 '09 at 10:41

14 Answers 14

up vote 57 down vote accepted

If you want to know if letter has any of the letters in AB you must use the AND & operator. Something like:

if ((letter & Letters.AB) != 0)
{
    // Some flag (A,B or both) is enabled
}
else
{
    // None of them are enabled
}
share|improve this answer
    
As far as I can see, this does the job. And had the clearest comments. Doesn't compile though without a parenthesis around letter & Letters.AB. Edited that in there. – Svish Aug 27 '09 at 10:57
    
Also if I introduced a Letters.None, I assume you could swap that with the 0 for a less compare-with-magic-number look? – Svish Aug 27 '09 at 11:07
    
Of course. But I don't think the AND comparison with 0 can be thought as a magic number strictly. – yeyeyerman Aug 27 '09 at 13:57
4  
also stackoverflow.com/questions/40211/how-to-compare-flags-in-c is a recommended answer as it checks against the item in question as opposed to checking if it equals 0 – dan richardson Dec 8 '10 at 16:47
    
@danrichardson the problem with the check for the exact item is that it eliminates the case when a part of the compound value is set (either A, or B), which is not what the OP wants. – Tom Lint Nov 20 '14 at 14:21

In .NET 4 you can use the Enum.HasFlag method :

using System;

[Flags] public enum Pet {
   None = 0,
   Dog = 1,
   Cat = 2,
   Bird = 4,
   Rabbit = 8,
   Other = 16
}

public class Example
{
   public static void Main()
   {
      // Define three families: one without pets, one with dog + cat and one with a dog only
      Pet[] petsInFamilies = { Pet.None, Pet.Dog | Pet.Cat, Pet.Dog };
      int familiesWithoutPets = 0;
      int familiesWithDog = 0;

      foreach (Pet petsInFamily in petsInFamilies)
      {
         // Count families that have no pets. 
         if (petsInFamily.Equals(Pet.None))
            familiesWithoutPets++;
         // Of families with pets, count families that have a dog. 
         else if (petsInFamily.HasFlag(Pet.Dog))
            familiesWithDog++;
      }
      Console.WriteLine("{0} of {1} families in the sample have no pets.", 
                        familiesWithoutPets, petsInFamilies.Length);   
      Console.WriteLine("{0} of {1} families in the sample have a dog.", 
                        familiesWithDog, petsInFamilies.Length);   
   }
}

The example displays the following output:

//       1 of 3 families in the sample have no pets. 
//       2 of 3 families in the sample have a dog.
share|improve this answer
2  
This does not address the OP question. You must still && multiple HasFlag operations to determine if any flags are set. So the question is does petsInFamily have either a Pet.Dog || Pet.Cat? – GoClimbColorado Sep 4 '15 at 1:23
    
See Mr. Skeet's clear answer... HasFlags Multiple – GoClimbColorado Sep 4 '15 at 1:29

I use extension methods to write things like that :

if (letter.IsFlagSet(Letter.AB))
    ...

Here's the code :

public static class EnumExtensions
{
    private static void CheckIsEnum<T>(bool withFlags)
    {
        if (!typeof(T).IsEnum)
            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("Type '{0}' is not an enum", typeof(T).FullName));
        if (withFlags && !Attribute.IsDefined(typeof(T), typeof(FlagsAttribute)))
            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("Type '{0}' doesn't have the 'Flags' attribute", typeof(T).FullName));
    }

    public static bool IsFlagSet<T>(this T value, T flag) where T : struct
    {
        CheckIsEnum<T>(true);
        long lValue = Convert.ToInt64(value);
        long lFlag = Convert.ToInt64(flag);
        return (lValue & lFlag) != 0;
    }

    public static IEnumerable<T> GetFlags<T>(this T value) where T : struct
    {
        CheckIsEnum<T>(true);
        foreach (T flag in Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)).Cast<T>())
        {
            if (value.IsFlagSet(flag))
                yield return flag;
        }
    }

    public static T SetFlags<T>(this T value, T flags, bool on) where T : struct
    {
        CheckIsEnum<T>(true);
        long lValue = Convert.ToInt64(value);
        long lFlag = Convert.ToInt64(flags);
        if (on)
        {
            lValue |= lFlag;
        }
        else
        {
            lValue &= (~lFlag);
        }
        return (T)Enum.ToObject(typeof(T), lValue);
    }

    public static T SetFlags<T>(this T value, T flags) where T : struct
    {
        return value.SetFlags(flags, true);
    }

    public static T ClearFlags<T>(this T value, T flags) where T : struct
    {
        return value.SetFlags(flags, false);
    }

    public static T CombineFlags<T>(this IEnumerable<T> flags) where T : struct
    {
        CheckIsEnum<T>(true);
        long lValue = 0;
        foreach (T flag in flags)
        {
            long lFlag = Convert.ToInt64(flag);
            lValue |= lFlag;
        }
        return (T)Enum.ToObject(typeof(T), lValue);
    }

    public static string GetDescription<T>(this T value) where T : struct
    {
        CheckIsEnum<T>(false);
        string name = Enum.GetName(typeof(T), value);
        if (name != null)
        {
            FieldInfo field = typeof(T).GetField(name);
            if (field != null)
            {
                DescriptionAttribute attr = Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(field, typeof(DescriptionAttribute)) as DescriptionAttribute;
                if (attr != null)
                {
                    return attr.Description;
                }
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Although kind of overkill to this question, thanks for posting. Might come in handy some day =) – Svish Aug 27 '09 at 11:10
    
This is perfect extension. Thanks. – Jirapong Sep 26 '11 at 10:55
    
You could make it a bit tighter like so: where T : struct, IConvertible. Great code otherwise! – Hamish Grubijan Apr 20 '12 at 22:45
    
@HamishGrubijan, good point... and enums also implement IFormattable and IComparable. However, all numeric types implement those interfaces too, so it's not enough to exclude them – Thomas Levesque Apr 20 '12 at 23:09
2  
Note: It makes allocations – Ondrej Petrzilka Jun 20 '12 at 9:08

There is HasFlag method in .NET 4 or higher.

if(letter.HasFlag(Letters.AB))
{
}
share|improve this answer

If you can use .NET 4 or higher than use HasFlag() method

examples

letter.HasFlag(Letters.A | Letters.B) // both A and B must be set

same as

letter.HasFlag(Letters.AB)
share|improve this answer

If it really annoys you, you can write a function like that:

public bool IsSet(Letters value, Letters flag)
{
    return (value & flag) == flag;
}

if (IsSet(letter, Letters.A))
{
   // ...
}

// If you want to check if BOTH Letters.A and Letters.B are set:
if (IsSet(letter, Letters.A & Letters.B))
{
   // ...
}

// If you want an OR, I'm afraid you will have to be more verbose:
if (IsSet(letter, Letters.A) || IsSet(letter, Letters.B))
{
   // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
The line return (value & flag) == flag; does not compile: "Operator '&' cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T'". – Fredrik Mörk Aug 27 '09 at 9:59
    
you need to cast to a long first... – Thomas Levesque Aug 27 '09 at 10:05
    
This does not help him with understanding of binary operations... – awe Aug 27 '09 at 10:09
1  
awe: The question was not about binary operations, the question was about simplifying the syntax of bitmask-related operations in C#. There are plenty of excellent binary operation related questions and answers on stackoverflow already, there is no need to repost them everywhere. – Tamas Czinege Aug 27 '09 at 10:24
    
I should recommend that those unfamiliar with binary operations get familiar, as the scaffolding to hide it above actually makes things much less readable in my opinion. Of course my 'raw' solution below is currently not doing so well compared to the score of this solution, so people are voting their preferences and I have to respect that ;-) – Will Aug 27 '09 at 10:30

To check if for example AB is set I can do this:

if((letter & Letters.AB) == Letters.AB)

Is there a simpler way to check if any of the flags of a combined flag constant are set than the following?

This checks that both A and B are set, and ignores whether any other flags are set.

if((letter & Letters.A) == Letters.A || (letter & Letters.B) == Letters.B)

This checks that either A or B is set, and ignores whether any other flags are set or not.

This can be simplified to:

if(letter & Letters.AB)

Here's the C for binary operations; it should be straightforward to apply this to C#:

enum {
     A = 1,
     B = 2,
     C = 4,
     AB = A | B,
     All = AB | C,
};

int flags = A|C;

bool anything_and_a = flags & A;

bool only_a = (flags == A);

bool a_and_or_c_and_anything_else = flags & (A|C);

bool both_ac_and_anything_else = (flags & (A|C)) == (A|C);

bool only_a_and_c = (flags == (A|C));

Incidentally, the naming of the variable in the question's example is the singular 'letter', which might imply that it represents only a single letter; the example code makes it clear that its a set of possible letters and that multiple values are allowed, so consider renaming the variable 'letters'.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't anything_and_a, a_and_or_c_and_anything_else and both_ac_and_anything_else always be true? or am I missing something here? – Svish Aug 27 '09 at 10:21
    
In this case, you can see what flags has been initialised to. However, should flags not contain A, then (flags & A) would be 0, which is false. both_ac_and_anything_else ensures that both A and C are set, but ignores any other flags that are also set (e.g. its true whether B is set or not). – Will Aug 27 '09 at 10:28
    
Hm, some of those ends up as numbers and not boolean in C# though. How would you convert them to boolean? – Svish Aug 27 '09 at 10:54
    
Its not implicitly converted for you? Zero is equiv to 'false', and all other values are 'true'. – Will Aug 27 '09 at 11:05

How about

if ((letter & Letters.AB) > 0)

?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes! This will filter on the A and B values, and ignore if C is included. So if it is >0, it is also A or B or AB. – awe Aug 27 '09 at 10:07
2  
This doesn't 100% work with signed values. != 0 is better than > 0 for this reason. – Stevo3000 Aug 27 '09 at 10:40

Would this work for you?

if ((letter & (Letters.A | Letters.B)) != 0)

Regards,

Sebastiaan

share|improve this answer

I created a simple extension method that does not need a check on Enum types:

public static bool HasAnyFlag(this Enum value, Enum flags)
{
    return
        value != null && ((Convert.ToInt32(value) & Convert.ToInt32(flags)) != 0);
}

It also works on nullable enums. The standard HasFlag method does not, so I created an extension to cover that too.

public static bool HasFlag(this Enum value, Enum flags)
{
    int f = Convert.ToInt32(flags);

    return
        value != null && ((Convert.ToInt32(value) & f) == f);
}

A simple test:

[Flags]
enum Option
{
    None = 0x00,
    One = 0x01,
    Two = 0x02,
    Three = One | Two,
    Four = 0x04
}

[TestMethod]
public void HasAnyFlag()
{
    Option o1 = Option.One;
    Assert.AreEqual(true, o1.HasAnyFlag(Option.Three));
    Assert.AreEqual(false, o1.HasFlag(Option.Three));

    o1 |= Option.Two;
    Assert.AreEqual(true, o1.HasAnyFlag(Option.Three));
    Assert.AreEqual(true, o1.HasFlag(Option.Three));
}

[TestMethod]
public void HasAnyFlag_NullableEnum()
{
    Option? o1 = Option.One;
    Assert.AreEqual(true, o1.HasAnyFlag(Option.Three));
    Assert.AreEqual(false, o1.HasFlag(Option.Three));

    o1 |= Option.Two;
    Assert.AreEqual(true, o1.HasAnyFlag(Option.Three));
    Assert.AreEqual(true, o1.HasFlag(Option.Three));
}

Enjoy!

share|improve this answer

There are a lot of answers on here but I think the most idiomatic way to do this with Flags would be Letters.AB.HasFlag(letter) or (Letters.A | Letters.B).HasFlag(letter) if you didn't already have Letters.AB. letter.HasFlag(Letters.AB) only works if it has both.

share|improve this answer
if((int)letter != 0) { }
share|improve this answer
    
You might the same mistake as I did - he wants to check if A or B is set but ignore C. – Daniel Brückner Aug 27 '09 at 10:04
    
You don't need the cast if you're checking the enum against 0. – Stevo3000 Aug 27 '09 at 10:12
    
This would check if any of all of them was set, not if any of a combined enum was set. – Svish Aug 27 '09 at 11:03

You could just check if the value is not zero.

if ((Int32)(letter & Letters.AB) != 0) { }

But I would consider it a better solution to introduce a new enumeration value with value zero and compare agains this enumeration value (if possible because you must be able to modify the enumeration).

[Flags]
enum Letters
{
    None = 0,
    A    = 1,
    B    = 2,
    C    = 4,
    AB   =  A | B,
    All  = AB | C
}

if (letter != Letters.None) { }

UPDATE

Missread the question - fixed the first suggestion and just ignore the second suggestion.

share|improve this answer
    
You don't need the cast if you're checking the enum against 0. – Stevo3000 Aug 27 '09 at 10:11

There are two aproaches that I can see that would work for checking for any bit being set.

Aproach A

if (letter != 0)
{
}

This works as long as you don't mind checking for all bits, including non-defined ones too!

Aproach B

if ((letter & Letters.All) != 0)
{
}

This only checks the defined bits, as long as Letters.All represents all of the possible bits.

For specific bits (one or more set), use Aproach B replacing Letters.All with the bits that you want to check for (see below).

if ((letter & Letters.AB) != 0)
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
You might the same mistake as I did - he wants to check if A or B is set but ignore C. – Daniel Brückner Aug 27 '09 at 10:03

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