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I have integers under the value of 255 and want to save them into an char array. Im experimenting with some tests:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int
main(void)
{
    char string[10];
    int integers[10]; //all under 255.

    int j;
    for(j=0; j<10; j++)
    {
            integers[j]=j;
    }

    int i;
    for(i=0; i<10; i++)
    {
            string[i]=(char)integers[i];
    }

    printf("%s \n", string);
    return 0;
}

when I run the debugger to the end of the of the program the string contains the following ascii values:

"\000\001\002\003\004\005\006\a\b\t"

First I dont understand why after the 006 an \a appears and at the end a \t?

Secondly I wonder if there is a better way to do what I am intending? Thanks

share|improve this question
    
The debugger thinks that if you have an array of characters, you'll want to interpret them as characters, so it gives more familiar notations for the characters that have an alternative to the octal notation. If you continued, you'd see \n, \r, \v appear too. AFAIK, there isn't a way to make GDB treat the array as an array of tiny integers rather than characters, but I'm not that expert in GDB and this has never worried me. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 15 '12 at 15:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What you're seeing are escaped representations of ASCII characters 0x06, 0x07, 0x08 and 0x09.

0x06 is ACK.

0x07 is BEL or \a (alert) and simply causes the terminal to go 'ding!'

0x08 is BS or backspace or \b.

0x09 is TAB or \t.

share|improve this answer
    
But if that is the case is there a way to read the \a \b and \t back to integer values? –  patriques Nov 15 '12 at 14:54
1  
@patriques: printf("%d \n", string); Also, if you want integers and not ASCII characters, then you should use uint8_t instead of char as the type of the variable. –  ReneSac Nov 15 '12 at 14:58

The ASCII characters you're using 0-9 are non-printable characters.

The printf function is formatting them as \nnn so that they can be seen.

The ASCII character 9 is a tab character, commonly represented as \t
The ASCII character 8 is the backspace character, represented as \b
The ASCII character 7 is a bell "or alarm" character, common represented as \a

See http://web.cs.mun.ca/~michael/c/ascii-table.html

share|improve this answer
#include <stdio.h>

int main (void)
{
    char string[10];
    int i;

    for(i=0; i<10; i++)
    {
      string[i] = i;
    }
    string[9] = '\0';

    printf("%s \n", string);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

You don't need to create the first integer array. You can fill directly the string array.

char string[11];
int i;
for(i=0; i<10; i++)
{
    string[i] = i;
}
string[i] = '\0';
share|improve this answer
    
well i thing you will overwrite 9 this way. Thanks –  patriques Nov 15 '12 at 15:00
    
I don't think so. 9 will be in string[9]. When the loop exits, i = 10. So string[i] is "empty" –  Asdine El Hrychy Nov 15 '12 at 15:08

use atoi function to convert ascii values to integer

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, but that isn't what the question is asking about. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 15 '12 at 15:03
    
But if that is the case is there a way to read the \a \b and \t back to integer values? – patriques 1 hour ago –  bvbdort Nov 15 '12 at 16:24
    
The \a notation is simply the way it is displayed; internally, it is a number (7). You'll find that 48 gets displayed as 0 (zero), and 65 as A and 97 as a, etc (unless you're using a very unusual code set). Plain char (as distinct from signed char or unsigned char) may be a signed or unsigned type; you may be able to store values from -128 to +127, or from 0 to 255. If you want 0 to 255 reliably, use unsigned char explicitly. But GDB will still display the integer values stored in any of the char types as characters when it can. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 15 '12 at 16:41

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