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I'm trying to theme some buttons according to their ancestors (not parents, especialy), so... I have the following HTML structure

<body class="theme-a">
  <section class="container">
    <form class="theme-b">
      <div class="button-group">
        <button type="button">Button B1</button>
        <button type="button">Button B2</button>
      </div>
      <div class="button-group">
        <button type="button">Button B3</button>
        <button type="button">Button B4</button>
      </div>
    </form>
    <form>
      <div class="button-group">
        <button type="button">Button A1</button>
        <button type="button">Button A2</button>
      </div>
      <div class="button-group">
        <button type="button">Button A3</button>
        <button type="button">Button A4</button>
      </div>
    </form>
  </section>
</body>

Well, as you can see, there are two themes .theme-a and .theme-b

The CSS code, looks like:

.theme-a {
  background: #999;
}
.theme-b {
  background: #555;
}
.theme-a button {
  background: #222;
}
.theme-b button {
  background: #69C;
}

The problem is: if you switch the theme classes (A with B and B with A), you'll notice that the button on A theme (which has a closer ancestor with the theme class, keeps the styling of the far ancestor, the blue background rather than black one).

How can I achieve a proper specificity in a way that the button properties are set according to the closest ancestor?

Here's the link from JSfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/XVaQT/1/

I hope that I explained in a clear way :)

Thanks ​

share|improve this question
    
The problem with specificity is that it has no notion of closest or furthest ancestor or sibling. Even combinators don't make a difference in specificity; E F is equally specific to E > F. –  BoltClock Nov 15 '12 at 16:06
    
@BoltClock The direct descendat rule is out of discussion :) As I said, the problem is related to ancestors, but not just with parents –  Chris X Nov 15 '12 at 16:27

1 Answer 1

Thanfully, with CSS you can combine multiple selectors to specify the same styles for lots of elements, I updated your jsfiddle with a working example, just change the classes theme-a and theme-b, as you said in your question, to see it working: http://jsfiddle.net/cchana/XVaQT/3/

All I have done is add a second selector where you were just looking for a button that is the descendant of an element with the class theme-a:

.theme-a button {
    background: #222;
}

It now also looks for a button that is the descendant of an element with the class theme-b that is itself a descendant of an element with the class theme-a:

.theme-a button,
.theme-a .theme-b button {
    background: #222;
}

There should be no need to add a !important to your background value as it will override the styles defined for .theme-b button thanks to this selector being more specific.

share|improve this answer
    
What if I have a 3 or 4 themes nesting (actually, I'm working on a 4 themes thing)? Imagine a theme for body, one for a section and one for the header of that section. I'll have to write every combination of themes? It won't be nice at all! –  Chris X Nov 15 '12 at 16:30
    
I agree it can get messy, but unfortunately, CSS only goes one way! You can select the child(ren) of a parent, but not the parent(s) of a child. To help make it easier to maintain, maybe LESS would be a good option, allowing you to nest/re-use styles. –  cchana Nov 15 '12 at 16:34
    
I know that you can't target the parent of a child. I'm also using Sass/SCSS for my styles, but I'm trying to find an elegant solution to this issue, hopefuly :) –  Chris X Nov 15 '12 at 17:02

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