Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's assume the following scenario in Java

public interface Foo {
    Object bar();
}

public class Baz implements Foo {
    public Object bar() {
        //My implementation
    }
}

Why can I not make Baz.bar() static?

Doing so results in the compiler error This static method cannot hide the instance method from Foo Adding an @Override annotation to Baz.bar() changes the compiler error to The method bar() of type Baz must override or implement a supertype method

It seems to me that from the perspective of anyone using the interface Foo, the implementing class Baz would still fulfill the interface requirements, while making a method that has a static implementation available to anyone who is explicitly using the Baz class without instantiation.

How come the compiler doesn't allow this scenario?

Edit:

Maybe I wasn't clear enough, but what I'm actually asking is why this isn't allowed, since from my point of view, I'm not decreasing the visibility of the interface-defined method.

And yes, I know I used the word abstract in the title, and not in the question, but that's because the abstract keyword is implied in an interface.

Edit 2:

I'll add an example that is closer to reality for clarity on why I am even asking this:

public interface DatabaseMapper<T extends DatabaseType> {
    Entry<T> convert(Entry);
}

public interface SQL extends DatabaseType {}

public class SQLEntry implements Entry<SQL> {}

public class SQLMapper implements DatabaseMapper<SQL> {
    public SQLEntry convert(Entry e) {
        //Convert some generic entry to the SQLEntry type
    }
}

In this case, I want to force all Mapper implementations to implement the convert method, but at the same time, this method might not depend in any way on the internal state of an SQLMapper object, and it might be desirable to be able to convert a generic Entry into a SQLEntry without going through an instantiation-process that probably includes database connection strings and the like.

This was the scenario I was faced with, and why I wanted to see if anyone knew why this was not possible to accomplish with the same method - e.g. not having to resort to a public static SQLEntry convertStatic(Entry e) which the overridden method delegates its implementation to.

Again though, I understand that this is not possible in Java due to how the compiler works - I am simply trying to understand why that is.

share|improve this question
    
Can you also show how your client is going to call this code? not sure what you're trying to achieve. –  JDPeckham Nov 15 '12 at 15:35
    
Updated to include a real world use case –  Joel Westberg Nov 15 '12 at 16:34
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The real answer is that Java simply wasn't defined this way. In other language, this is possible.

For instance, in Scala there aren't static methods, but you can instead define static object that are singleton and that allow this. In dynamic language like Smalltalk or Ruby, classes are like objects, and this is also possible.

But in Java, static methods are similar to global methods. There is not concept of self, nor super in a static method because it's not bound to an object. By consequence inheritance/overriding doesn't really apply.

It unfolds that if there is no notion of inheritance, it also doesn't make sense to speak of abstract.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm begrudgingly accepting that the best answer is "because Java wasn't defined this way." Thanks for expanding on inheritance of class objects –  Joel Westberg Nov 19 '12 at 14:40
add comment
public class Baz implements Foo {
    public Object bar() {
        //My implementation
    }
 public static  Object bar() {
        //My implementation
    }
}

because, your method signatures are same, bar () is not overloaded. as you have declared a non-static bar() in your abstract class, you are forced to implement that method in this class.

share|improve this answer
    
final is allowed though, so why isn't static? I honestly can't see how I'm decreasing the visibility of the method in any way with the static keyword. –  Joel Westberg Nov 15 '12 at 15:24
    
static changes it from instance level to global level. You can't polymorph a global method so therefore you can't make a polymorphic method global. Final says it's read only/immutable. try reading this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Java_keywords –  JDPeckham Nov 15 '12 at 15:25
1  
@JDPeckham.. You should not say its global level. It changes the whole meaning of static keyword. Rather it's from instance level to class level. –  Rohit Jain Nov 15 '12 at 15:26
    
@JoelWestberg it hides the `public Object bar(), because it has the same name as the interface method without actually over-writing it –  Sam I am Nov 15 '12 at 15:28
1  
@SamIam I understand that, I'm asking the question: why can't it override the interface method? I'm asking from a language design perspective, not because I don't understand the compiler error. –  Joel Westberg Nov 15 '12 at 15:30
show 2 more comments

Abstract methods are supposed to be overridden (Defined) by a subclass method. You can't override static methods as they do not pertain to an instance but to the specific class they are defined.

For example a non static method is used as such:

Foo b = new Baz();
Object result = b.bar();

static is used as such:

Object result = Baz.bar2();

if you really want bar to be static and also an override at the instance level do this:

public interface Foo {
    Object bar();
}

public class Baz implements Foo {
    @Override
    public Object bar() {
          return Baz.bar2();
    }
    public static Object bar2() {
     //your implementation
    }

}
share|improve this answer
3  
your answer makes me want to downvote the OP for either including the word abstract in his title, or excluding the word abstract from his question –  Sam I am Nov 15 '12 at 15:21
2  
@SamIam an interface method is abstract... –  Joel Westberg Nov 15 '12 at 15:22
    
@JDPeckham - your suggested solution doesn't compile due to duplicate methods bar() in Baz... –  Joel Westberg Nov 15 '12 at 15:38
    
@Joel Westberg sorry didn't have a java compiler. You could call the static method whatever you want because it won't break clients of the interface. I'll change it. –  JDPeckham Nov 15 '12 at 15:44
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.