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I don't know why if I have the following code:

int main() {
    long int height_cat, number_worker_cats, number_helper_cats, height_tree;
    bool flag;
    scanf("%ld%ld", &height_cat, &number_worker_cats);
    for (number_helper_cats = 1; ; ++number_helper_cats) {
        for (height_tree = 1; (long int)pow(number_helper_cats + 1, height_tree) <= height_cat; ++height_tree) {
            if ((long int)(pow(number_helper_cats + 1, height_tree) - height_cat) == 0 && (long int)(pow(number_helper_cats, height_tree) - number_worker_cats) == 0) {
                flag = true;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (flag) {
            break;
        }
    }
 printf("%ld, %ld\n", number_helper_cats, height_tree);
}

I'm searching for number_helper_cats and height_tree which (number_helper_cats +1)^height_tree = height_cat and number_helper_cats^height_tree = number_worker_cats where height_cat and number_worker_cats are integers.

For example if height_cat = 216 and number_worker_cats = 125, the code will stop on number_helper_cats = 5 and height_tree = 3 since (5+1)^3 = 216 and 5^3 = 125.

But if I have the following code it doesnt work, loops forever, why?

int main() {
    long int height_cat, number_worker_cats, number_helper_cats, height_tree;
    bool flag;
    scanf("%ld%ld", &height_cat, &number_worker_cats);
    for (number_helper_cats = 1; ; ++number_helper_cats) {
        for (height_tree = 1; pow(number_helper_cats + 1, height_tree) <= height_cat; ++height_tree) {
            if ((long int)(pow(number_helper_cats + 1, height_tree)) == height_cat &&
                        (long int)(pow(number_helper_cats, height_tree)) == number_worker_cats) {
                flag = true;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (flag) {
            break;
        }
    }
printf("%ld, %ld\n", number_helper_cats, height_tree);
}

Everything is long int and every height_cat and number_worker_cats for testcase are true for the operations, another example height_cat = 5764801, number_worker_cats = 1679616, number_helper_cats = 6 and height_tree = 8 because (6 + 1)^8 = 5764801, 6^8 = 1679616. But again the first code runs well, and the second one loops forever. pow are precise I mean 6^3 = 216 and 5^3 = 125 right? :p

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3  
At least tell us which loop is infinite. And I bet that once you have figured that out, you'll know the answer. –  MSalters Nov 15 '12 at 15:56
    
@MSalters It seems clear (I think anyway) that the outer loop is the one going forever: Once you hit a certain number of helper cats the inner loop won't even iterate, preventing flag from ever being set. –  Mark B Nov 15 '12 at 16:00
    
The code (well I had to add a bunch of boilerplate to get it to compile) terminates just fine with g++ 4.5 and no optimization, -O2, -O3, and even -O3 -ffast-math. Please give us a complete example that we can compile and run to exhibit the problem as well as which compiler and architecture you're on. –  Mark B Nov 15 '12 at 16:09
    
@Mark B I just put the complete code for both cases –  Avenger Nov 15 '12 at 20:19
    
@user1827024 Looks like a good job for a debugger. Or, if you don't have a debugger, use the following idea: if (number_helper_cats == 6 and height_tree == 8) printf("%ld\n", (long int)(pow(number_helper_cats + 1, height_tree))); –  anatolyg Nov 15 '12 at 22:45

1 Answer 1

The result of pow is double, and double numbers are not precise in a lot of cases. To test equality with a double, a common method would be

if (abs(pow(number_helper_cats + 1, height_tree) - height_cat)) < 0.001); // 0.001 is an arbitrary small number
{
     ...
}

Aand for test for <=, you should use pow(number_helper_cats + 1, height_tree) <= height_cat + 0.001 .

However, I must mention that you code cannot produce the infinite loop you mentioned in your quesiton with my gcc 4.7.2 . All your loops just end normally.

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2  
"double numbers are never precise". This is patently untrue. In particular, double(216) and double(125) ARE precise. If anything, pow() isn't precise but even that would surprise me here. –  MSalters Nov 15 '12 at 15:54
1  
Actually double can exactly represent a wide variety of integral values. Without knowing the inputs it's hard to say if this is the problem. –  Mark B Nov 15 '12 at 15:54
    
@MSalters Well, I made a strong statement here, I'll try to rephrase it. But I do believe pow would not produce a precise result, as it should not have a special algorithm written for ingtegers. –  fefe Nov 15 '12 at 16:01
1  
@fefe: In implementations I have seen, it did have such an integer-specific algorithm. –  MSalters Nov 15 '12 at 16:05
1  
@fefe but pow(7, 8) = 5764801, not 5764800.99999999 –  Avenger Nov 16 '12 at 18:23

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