Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using an existing Oracle database (that I did not construct, and know nothing about beyond its table structure). Some queries are pretty fast, and other seemingly very similar ones are very slow. For example

SELECT a.price, c.banner_id, c.short_name
FROM ret_price_current a
  JOIN ret_store b ON a.store_id = b.store_id
  JOIN ret_banner c ON b.banner_id = c.banner_id
  JOIN ret_store2cbsa_csa d ON a.store_id = d.store_id
WHERE rownum<3

(1.09, 74, 'Safeway')
(1.09, 74, 'Safeway')
that took 0.243073940277 seconds

but if I add a seemingly simple WHERE condition:

SELECT a.price, c.banner_id, c.short_name
FROM ret_price_current a
  JOIN ret_store b ON a.store_id = b.store_id
  JOIN ret_banner c ON b.banner_id = c.banner_id
  JOIN ret_store2cbsa_csa d ON a.store_id = d.store_id
WHERE c.banner_id = 74
  AND rownum<3

it has been running without returning for many minutes now. What is going on? (For reference, ret_price_current has ~300m entries and the others are much smaller.) I imagine it has to do with indices -- can someone point me to a book about database algorithms (like how queries actually work on the back end) so I can understand wtf is going on?

share|improve this question
1  
You probably need an index on banner_id or an index on banner_id and rownum. What table has the rownum field? –  Marlin Pierce Nov 15 '12 at 15:41
2  
rownum simply tells oracle to return only the first n rows –  andyInCambridge Nov 15 '12 at 15:42
7  
You need to view the EXPLAIN plan on the queries to see what type of operations they are performing on the tables. –  Lost in Alabama Nov 15 '12 at 16:32
1  
Yes, if you want to know how queries work in the back end first look at the query plan (CTRL-E in TOAD). When you run a query, the optimiser comes up with a plan based on things it knows or assumes. The plan describes how data is accessed and joined together. If you check the plan for the two different queries you can be certain they are different. –  ElectricLlama Nov 16 '12 at 5:26
4  
oracle knows that the first query can only return three rows - and you don't care which three; thus it can just hit the indexes on all the tables. The 2nd query requires that oracle actually do more work as it has to look at the result of the join - if there are many rows with a value of 74 it may decide to do a full table scan. –  William May 23 '13 at 14:06

1 Answer 1

The reason is that ROWNUM is generated on the rows as they are outputted.

Your first query has no critera, therefore it will spit out the first 3 rows and be done with it. You can generally find any 3 rows that match pretty fast.

Your second has to find 3 rows that match the criteria before it can stop (and it might never find those 3 rows).

The queries are completely different hence the different times to execute.

The way to get this running fast would be to index c.banner_id (and, in fact, all your FKs).

oops - just noticed the timestamp on this by another answer. I'll leave this here anyway as it does answer the questions, as does one of the comments.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Don't worry about the question time stamps. Lately, all sorts of questions have been resurrected by editing. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Jul 19 '13 at 7:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.