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I have the following class (example):

public class Dog
{
    int numberOfTeeth;

    public Dog() 
    { 
        countTeeth(); 
    }

    private void countTeeth()
    {
        this.numberOfTeeth = 5; //this dog has seen better days, apparently
    }

}

After I create the dog object, it should have the number of teeth calculated. I'd like to be able to access that value without being able to modify it outside the class itself.

Dog d = new Dog();
int dogTeeth = d.numberOfTeeth; //this should be possible
d.numberOfTeeth = 10; //this should not

However, I can't figure out which access modifier will let me do this. I've tried all of the following:

If I make numberOfTeeth private, I cannot access it.
If I make numberOfTeeth protected internal, I can change this value outside the class.
If I make numberOfTeeth internal, I can change this value outside the class.
If I make numberOfTeeth protected, I cannot access it.
If I make numberOfTeeth public, I can change this value outside the class.

I also tried making it readonly but then was unable to set it outside the constructor.

Is there any access modifier which will allow me to do this? Or is there some other method of accomplishing this protection?

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1  
Just to clarify: numberOfTeeth is a field in your example and not a property. –  Brian Rasmussen Nov 15 '12 at 15:48
    
@BrianRasmussen Ahh, right you are. Thanks! –  Mansfield Nov 15 '12 at 15:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Create a property with a private setter:

public int NumberOfTeeth
{
 get; private set;
}

Notice I changed it to Pascal Case to match most .NET style standards.

share|improve this answer
    
Works like a charm - thanks! –  Mansfield Nov 15 '12 at 15:51
    
But what if I'm not using a primitive type? Let's take a List<> for example. What prevents other classes from adding/removing items to it? I know that I can use ReadOnlyCollection in this specific instance, but I'm looking for a general solution. –  Pieter Feb 18 '14 at 12:50
    
@Pieter You could add logic to the getter to always return a new collection - that way if the caller adds items they would be adding items to a copy. In that case, however, I would not use a property but a GetXXXX method - that's typically the pattern used to indicate that the result is a copy. –  D Stanley Feb 18 '14 at 13:53
    
@Pieter if you want to ask that as a new question I'd be happy to give you a sample :) –  D Stanley Feb 18 '14 at 13:54

You can't do that. You can make the field read-only and make a method that returns its value. You can also make an auto-property with a public getter and a protected setter:

public int NumberOfTeeth { get; protected set; }
share|improve this answer
public class Dog
{
    public int numberOfTeeth { get; private set; }

    public Dog() 
    {   
        countTeeth(); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You should make the field private and create a read-only (no setter) public property:

public class Dog
{
    private int numberOfTeeth;
    public int NumberOfTeeth {get {return numberOfTeeth;}}

    public Dog() 
    { 
        countTeeth(); 
    }

    private void countTeeth()
    {
        this.numberOfTeeth = 5; //this dog has seen better days, apparently
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
you can avoid having a separate method for teeth calculation by using a private setter and doing your teeth counting code in there. Would make for cleaner code. EDIT D Stanley already posted the answer I commented here. –  CoffeeMuncher Nov 15 '12 at 15:53
    
@CoffeeMuncher Unfortunately my "real" code is fairly complex so I think a separate method is necessary. Thanks for the tip though! –  Mansfield Nov 15 '12 at 15:55
    
I assumed countTeeth() was just there to demontrate a private access. It surely could be refactored depending on the real usage. –  Eren Ersönmez Nov 15 '12 at 15:56
    
@Mansfield are you adding logic to prevent calculation every time? It might improve efficiency not to do the calculation each time you call the method; all depends on how complex it is. –  CoffeeMuncher Nov 15 '12 at 15:57
    
@CoffeeMuncher the method is called in the constructor, so when the object is created. Unfortunately the calculation is needed every time the object is created, and it changes based on the values of the fields in the class. –  Mansfield Nov 15 '12 at 15:58

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