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I am using SqlServer 2005. I would like to set a property (like default value, but for any change, not just inserts) that would update a date. In other words, on every update and insert, the current date would be placed in the column. How would this be achieved?

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A date in each row, or one single date somewhere? –  Aaron Bertrand Nov 15 '12 at 15:46
    
Google "trigger" –  texasbruce Nov 15 '12 at 15:47
1  
You're probably looking for an INSTEAD OF TRIGGER. –  ShyJ Nov 15 '12 at 15:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let's suppose you have an A table:

CREATE TABLE A (
  ID INT,
  Name VARCHAR(20),
  SomeDate DATE NULL)

You can create triggers:

CREATE TRIGGER INSTEAD_OF_A_INSERT
ON A
INSTEAD OF INSERT AS
BEGIN

INSERT INTO A (ID, Name, SomeDate)
SELECT ID, Name, GETDATE ()
FROM inserted 

END
GO

CREATE TRIGGER INSTEAD_OF_A_UPDATE
ON A
INSTEAD OF UPDATE AS
BEGIN

UPDATE A
SET SomeDate = GETDATE(),
    Name = I.Name
FROM A A1 JOIN INSERTED I ON A1.ID = I.ID

END
GO

Which will give what you want

INSERT INTO A (ID, Name)
VALUES(1, 'John');

INSERT INTO A (ID, Name)
VALUES(2, 'Jack');

UPDATE A
SET Name = 'Jane'

    SELECT *
    FROM A

Here is a fiddle you can play with.

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Thanks. I've read a little on triggers. Is this the only way to do it, other than just updates/inserting the value directly? I'm trying to find my best options, although it does seem that triggers is the standard. –  steventnorris Nov 15 '12 at 16:55
    
If you want to do it at DB server level this is the only way I know of. –  ShyJ Nov 15 '12 at 16:59
    
@steventnorris if you can control data access via stored procedures, then you wouldn't necessarily need a trigger if you set permissions correctly and control those who can bypass the procedures. But if you allow ad hoc DML then yes this is the way I would do it (while you consider whether you should allow ad hoc DML). –  Aaron Bertrand Nov 16 '12 at 16:21

The easiest (but not necessarily most efficient) way to do this would be with a trigger.

See MSDN.

You could either use an AFTER INSERT,UPDATE or an INSTEAD OF INSERT,UPDATE - either could be made to do the job depending on your exact requirements.

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