Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using a TrulyObservableCollection as a datasource in a WPF DataGrid. My class implements the PropertyChange event properly (I get notification when a property changes). The CollectionChanged event gets triggered as well. However, my issue lies in the connection between the PropertyChanged event and CollectionChanged event. I can see in the PropertyChanged event which item is being changed (in this case the sender object), however I can't seem to find a way to see which one is changed from within the CollectionChanged event. The sender object is the whole collection. What's the best way to see which item has changed in the CollectionChanged event? The relevant code snippets are below. Thank you for your help, and let me know if there needs to be some clarification.

Code for setting up the collection:

    private void populateBret()
    {
        bretList = new TrulyObservableCollection<BestServiceLibrary.bretItem>(BestClass.BestService.getBretList().ToList());
        bretList.CollectionChanged += bretList_CollectionChanged;
        dgBretList.ItemsSource = bretList;
        dgBretList.Items.Refresh();
    }

    void bretList_CollectionChanged(object sender, System.Collections.Specialized.NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        //Do stuff here with the specific item that has changed
    }

Class that is used in the collection:

public class bretItem : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private int _blID;
    public string _blGroup;

    [DataMember]
    public int blID
    {
        get { return _blID; }
        set
        {
            _blID = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("blID");
        }
    }

    [DataMember]
    public string blGroup
    {
        get { return _blGroup; }
        set
        {
            _blGroup = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("blGroup");
        }
    }

    protected void OnPropertyChanged (String name)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
        }
    }
}

TrulyObservableCollection class

public class TrulyObservableCollection<T> : ObservableCollection<T> where T : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        public TrulyObservableCollection()
            : base()
        {
            CollectionChanged += new NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler(TrulyObservableCollection_CollectionChanged);
        }
        public TrulyObservableCollection(List<T> list)
            : base(list)
        {
            foreach (var item in list)
            {
                item.PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(item_PropertyChanged);
            }
            CollectionChanged += new NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler(TrulyObservableCollection_CollectionChanged);
        }

        void TrulyObservableCollection_CollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            if (e.NewItems != null)
            {
                foreach (Object item in e.NewItems)
                {
                    (item as INotifyPropertyChanged).PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(item_PropertyChanged);
                }
            }
            if (e.OldItems != null)
            {
                foreach (Object item in e.OldItems)
                {
                    (item as INotifyPropertyChanged).PropertyChanged -= new PropertyChangedEventHandler(item_PropertyChanged);
                }
            }
        }

        void item_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs a = new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset);
            OnCollectionChanged(a);
        }
    }

EDIT:

In the item_PropertyChanged event the NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs are set with NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset. This causes the OldItems and NewItems to be null, therefore I can't get the changed item in that case. I can't use .Add as the Datagrid is updated with an additional item. I can't appear to get .Replace to work either to get the changed item.

share|improve this question
    
Can you explain more about why are concerned with changes to properties of objects within the collection and why that is important to handled within the collection? –  Josh C. Nov 15 '12 at 17:35
    
Why not use a separate class to track the item that is changing? –  Josh C. Nov 15 '12 at 18:27
    
@JoshC., I'm using this to know when to process saving changes and whatnot to our database (various reasons why the datagrid can't have a direct binding to the database that I will not get into). If I were to use a separate class to track, how would I go about setting that up? Are you suggesting that I have a class that has a list of the bretItem instead of using an ObservableCollection? Thanks –  jmgardn2 Nov 15 '12 at 18:30
    
I am posting an answer. –  Josh C. Nov 15 '12 at 18:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about this:

In your ViewModel that contains the ObservableCollection of bretItem, the ViewModel subscribes to the CollectionChanged event of the ObservableCollection.

This will prevent the need of a new class TrulyObservableCollection derived from ObservableCollection that is coupled to the items within its collection.

Within the handler in your ViewModel, you can add and remove the PropertyChanged event handler as you are now. Since it is now your ViewModel that is being informed of the changes to objects within the collection, you can take the appropriate action.

public class BretListViewModel
{

    private void populateBret()
    {
        bretList = new ObservableCollection<BestServiceLibrary.bretItem>(BestClass.BestService.getBretList().ToList());
        bretList.CollectionChanged += bretList_CollectionChanged;              
    }

    void bretList_CollectionChanged(object sender, System.Collections.Specialized.NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
         if (e.NewItems != null)
        {
            foreach (Object item in e.NewItems)
            {
                (item as INotifyPropertyChanged).PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(item_PropertyChanged);
            }
        }
        if (e.OldItems != null)
        {
            foreach (Object item in e.OldItems)
            {
                (item as INotifyPropertyChanged).PropertyChanged -= new PropertyChangedEventHandler(item_PropertyChanged);
            }
        }
    }


    void item_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var bret = sender as bretItem;

        //Update the database now!

        //One note:
        //The ObservableCollection raises its change event as each item changes.
        //You should consider a method of batching the changes (probably using an ICommand)
    }

}

A Thing of Note:

As an aside, it looks like you are breaking the MVVM pattern based upon this snippet:

dgBretList.ItemsSource = bretList;
dgBretList.Items.Refresh();

You probably should consider loading your ViewModel and binding your View to it instead of coding logic in the code-behind of your View.

share|improve this answer
    
Hadn't really thought about a ViewModel. Your sample looks perfect. Since I'll have a few different classes with the same idea, I was trying to stick with a generalized "ViewModel" instead of a specific one. This, however, isn't as bad as I thought it would be. Looks like it should work like a gem though, thank you! In response to your note, the bretList is populated through a WCF operation and as far as I'm aware there isn't a way to bind this directly through the xaml. –  jmgardn2 Nov 15 '12 at 19:01
    
@jmgardn2 I didn't mean bind through xaml, I meant build your collection, pass it into the ViewModel (think DI), then bind your xaml to the ViewModel. You don't want to code your View to your data sources. –  Josh C. Nov 15 '12 at 19:03
    
I think I'm understanding this better now. Thank you again for your help and explanations. I will test out the code shortly. –  jmgardn2 Nov 15 '12 at 19:17

It's not appropriate to use the collection changed event in this way because it's only meant to be fired when adding/removing items from the collection. Which is why you've hit a wall. You're also in danger of breaking the Liskov substitution principle with this approach.

It's probably better to implement the INotifyPropertyChanged interface on your collection class and fire that event when one of your items fires its property changed event.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm looking to handle when an item is changed. Currently, the PropertyChanged event fires the CollectionChanged event. I was hoping to be able to handle a changed property in the CollectionChanged event. –  jmgardn2 Nov 15 '12 at 16:18
    
Clarifying questions should be posted as comments, not answers. –  Servy Nov 15 '12 at 16:20
    
@Servy: Question: "Get changed item from CollectionChanged" Answer: Look at the OldItems and NewItems collections. If clarifying questions in answers is wrong then half of stackoverflow is also wrong. –  Phil Gan Nov 15 '12 at 17:00
    
@PhilGan Half of all answers are not clarifying questions. There are a fair number of them, but the community is pretty good about ensuring they get deleted or converted to comments. –  Servy Nov 15 '12 at 17:08
    
@PhilGan, see the update above in regards to your comment. –  jmgardn2 Nov 15 '12 at 18:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.