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My project started out as a kind of experiment to see how I could lay out some Python classes to solve a problem. I have completed the experiment and proven out a design, but the resulting standalone application doesn't have any kind of user interface, just a class structure and a hardcoded (don't judge me! :) ) sample main() to test out and prove the design.

Now I want to make it into a real application. There are a number of good, functional classes that I've already developed and tested, but were designed only to exist in memory at run-time. A number of the classes would translate into individual tables nicely.

My question is ... what is the best approach to take my existing work and port it over so that it can be used in a django application?

One thought I had was to simple re-factor everything, taking the functionality of the classes I've already written and convert them into models (and somehow deal with the inheritance relationships). Another thought is to create new models that use the existing classes.

Example Code (forgive me if this isn't exactly perfect Python code, I just made it up as an example to demonstrate the problem):

Class R (object):
      def __init__(name):
          self.name = name

      def done():
          return "Done: %s" % (self.name)

Class B (object):
      def __init__(name, value):
          self.name = name
          self.value = value

      def tell():
           return "Tell: %s" % (self.name)

Class RB(R):
      def __init__(name, bobj)
          self.bobj = bobj
          super(RB, self).__init__(name)

      def doall():
           return "%s\n%s" % (self.robj.done(), self.bobj.tell())

I could create a Model for R, B and RB where each is ported directly to Model equivalents.

Class R(models.Model):
      name = model.CharField()

      def done():
           return "Done: %s" % (self.name)

Class B(models.Model):
      name = model.CharField()


      def tell():
           return "Tell: %s" % (self.name)

Class RB(models.Model):
      robj = models.ForeignKey(R)
      bobj = models.ForeignKey(B)

      def doall():
           return "%s\n%s" % (self.robj.done(), self.bobj.tell())

something like that.. or I could do this:

Class Rdj(models.Model):
      name = model.CharField()
      def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
           self.helper = R(self.name)

      def done():
           return self.helper.done()

Class Bdj(models.Model):
      name = model.CharField()
      def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
           self.helper = B(self.name)

      def tell():
           return self.helper.tell()

Class RBdj(models.Model):
      robj = models.ForeignKey(Rdj)
      bobj = models.ForeignKey(Bdj)
      def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
          self.helper = RB(self.robj.name, self.bobj)

      def doall():
          return self.helper.doall()

The benefit of the latter is that I get all the functionality that I've already written without cutting-and-pasting it. But it doesn't seem like the right thing to do because I've essentially encapsulated the functionality and then require the classes to know about all about and track the data management of the helper class it is using. When I add an address member to the R class, I'll have to also add an address member to the Rdj class. Just doesn't seem "pythonic".

Given I have nearly no experience in Python (I'm a PERL guy) and even less in Django, what's the right way to think about this? I'd like to see the core classes be independent of the Django implementation (as if they were third party).. but open to suggestions.

Thanks for your help!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The first way (just rewriting the code), seems perfectly correct, especially is you do not want to keep the code from the proof of concept.

All you need to do is add the fields to your classes and you're done. No need to maintain some compatibility with the old code if you don't plan on keeping it.


If you need to keep the original code, one way might be to inherit directly from the original classes. That way, you get the original code will directly use the fields from the django part.

Class Rdj(models.Model, R):
  __init__ = models.Model.__init__ # We want to keep django's __init__
  name = model.CharField()


Class Bdj(models.Model, B):
  __init__ = models.Model.__init___
  name = model.CharField()


Class RBdj(models.Model, RB):
  __init__ = models.Model.__init__
  robj = models.ForeignKey(Rdj)
  bobj = models.ForeignKey(Bdj)
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, makes sense. If I did end up wanting to keep it, am how would an experienced pythonic person think about the port? –  Eric Horne Nov 16 '12 at 23:36
    
If you want to keep the original code, you try to refactor is as an easy-to-use library, that you can call from you django code without writing to much code. If the object-oriented aspect of the original code is important, you could make your django classes inherit from the original classes (so that you don't need to forward each and every call to the original code). I'll edit my answer with an example. –  madjar Nov 18 '12 at 9:28
    
oh! I didn't know Python supported multiple inheritance. Ok, thanks a bunch! –  Eric Horne Nov 18 '12 at 13:26

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