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I would like to achieve the following: I want a free Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) environment surrounding vs2008 sp1. (My company is short of cash).

I want all the stuff: CI, BugTracking, task panel, Wiki, Source control... all integrating themselves. If I could have some kind of scrum managing tools it would be better.

Any recommendation?

Thanks in advance.

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The term you are looking for is ALM, so you don't get IDE suggestions –  Richard Aug 27 '09 at 10:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is pretty much the set-up we have.

If you have a full version of visual studio 2008 rather than the express edition, it integrates the inbuilt MSTest much better than NUnit does, and cruise control also supports MSTest.

BugTracker.net and Trac both have subversion integration, (although IIRC trac is a bit weird to get set up). The gotcha to watch out for with Trac is that it doesn't support multiple projects very well, this was why we went for BugTracker.net in the end. (This may have changed, I know it was planned for a future version when we were last looking at it 6 months ago)

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It does perhaps not fill the "all integrating themselves" part, but the following toolbox should take you rather far:

  • Visual Studio 2008 Express
  • TestDriven.NET (won't work as an addin to VS, I think, but will work well with CC.NET)
  • Subversion
  • TortoiseSVN
  • CruiseControl.NET

Regarding bugtracking I have not used any OS bugtrackers, so I leave that up to others to suggest.

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TestDriven .NET is no longer free. –  yeyeyerman Aug 27 '09 at 10:39
    
@yeyeyerman: good point. It's free only for personal/open source projects and students. –  Fredrik Mörk Aug 27 '09 at 10:42

Source control:

  • SubVersion
  • Git

and two widely used open source tools. Then look for integration for choices of other tools.

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I think you make a good point here. Start by selecting your source control. Source control is critical and central to a project, and many of them have slightly different philosophies and styles. Pick one that suites your development styles best, then work from there by looking at which tools support the source control you choose. –  Simon P Stevens Aug 27 '09 at 10:48

I would use the following tools:

  • IDE: SharpDevelop
  • Source control: SVN and TortoiseSVN
  • Bug tracking, wiki, ...: Redmine
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Concerning code quality checking, architecture exploration, code versions diff and more... you can have a look at NDepend. It is a commercial tool, but comes with a free limited version, free for OSS and Academics projects.

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