Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've to write a program that prints prime numbers from 1 to 100 (every 5 numbers on a line) using 2 functions: the first to test the number if it's odd and the second to test it if it's prime

I wrote that code but it didn't work it only prints the last prime number before 100

thanx ^_^

#include "stdafx.h"

bool is_odd(int x)
{
    if (x%2==0)
        return false;
    else
        return true;
}

bool is_prime(int x)
{
    int j=0;
    if (!(is_odd(x)))
        return false;

    if(is_odd(x))
    {
        for(int i=1;i<=x;i++)
            if (x%i==0)
                j=j+1;

        if (j==2)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }
}


void main()
{
    int x[100][100];
    int i=1;    

    while (i<=100) 
    {
        for(int j=1;j<=20;j++)
            for(int k=1;k<=5;k++)
                if (is_prime(i))
                    x[j][k]=i;
        i++;
    }
    for(int j=1;j<=20;j++)
    {
        for(int k=1;k<=5;k++)
            cout<<x[j][k]<<' ';
        cout<<endl;
    }
}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by C. A. McCann, H2CO3, corsiKa, Ragunath Jawahar, Jamey Sharp Nov 15 '12 at 18:30

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
-1 because you put no effort in. –  Luchian Grigore Nov 15 '12 at 16:31
4  
ouch... modulo math to check for oddness? return (x & 0x1)? The whole oddness business could be eliminated by simply SKIPPING all even numbers. e.g. i=i+2, instead of i++ –  Marc B Nov 15 '12 at 16:33
2  
As an aside, your code would be a lot more readable if you indented according to an accepted standard. –  Component 10 Nov 15 '12 at 16:33
6  
This pattern is always stupid: if (condition) return true; else return false; It's not safe enough, and it really should be: if (condition == true) { return condition ? true : false; } else { return condition && false; }. (This is is sometimes called the "safer bool" idiom.) –  Kerrek SB Nov 15 '12 at 16:37
1  
Note that if (x%2==0) return false; else return true; can be written much more simply: return x%2 != 0;. –  Pete Becker Nov 15 '12 at 16:37
show 9 more comments

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Such amazing complexity for a simple problem. You don't need arrays to do this, not even multi-dimensional arrays.

int main()
{
    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 1; i <= 100; ++i)
    {
        if (is_prime(i))
        {
            cout << i << ' ';
            ++count;
            if (count == 5)
            {
                cout << endl;
                count = 0;
            }
        }
    }
    cout << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanx very much –  Fatema Nov 15 '12 at 16:55
add comment

It's printing the last number (97) because during each iteration of your loop on i, you're setting all elements of the array x, then printing it at the end. So naturally, all you'll get is the last prime number. If you want to print only the primes and still maintain your grid, you should do something like this for your if (is_prime(i)) clause:

if (is_prime(i)) {
    x[numPrimes / 5][numPrimes % 5] = i;
    numPrimes ++;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.