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I am getting access violation error in the below code..i have pointed it out in the program.

void *pBuff = 0;

void set_data(void *pBuff)
{
    int value = 70, i;
    int *phy_bn = new int[8];

    for(i=0; i<8; i++)phy_bn[i] = value;

    pBuff =phy_bn;
    cout<<((int*)pBuff)[0];//..accessing 0th element value..no error here..gives 70 as result..
}


int main()
{
    set_data(pBuff);
    cout<<((int*)pBuff)[0];//acces violation error
    return 0;
}

Why that access violation even when i am not assigning it the address of a local variable...

Yes i can use vector or pass by reference.

But i want to know why pBuff is not getting assigned

share|improve this question
    
You're going to have to pass either a pointer reference or a double pointer if you're expecting to be able to pass a newly created buffer out via a parameter. That's just the way the language works! –  Rook Nov 15 '12 at 17:14
    
Pass your pointer by reference rather than value. I.e. void set_data(void*& pBuff) –  WhozCraig Nov 15 '12 at 17:15
    
@Rook, @WhozCraig note that pBuff is already global. Not necessarily the best way to do it, but they don't need a double pointer in their current setup. –  Xymostech Nov 15 '12 at 17:15
    
@Xymostech indeed, which is why I qualified my statement and specifically referred to parameters ;-) –  Rook Nov 15 '12 at 17:17
1  
"i want to avoid double pointers..its not required i guess..." - a double pointer, or a reference to pointer, certainly is required if you want to pass a pointer by reference. Whether you should be doing that (and whether you should be using global variables, manual memory management, and untyped pointers) is an entirely different question. –  Mike Seymour Nov 15 '12 at 17:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you say

pBuff = phy_bn;

You're just changing the local value of pBuff, not the global value of pBuff. Either pass pBuff as a double pointer, or simply remove the argument to the function, as pBuff is global already.

void *pBuff = 0; /* This is the global pBuff, which isn't being changed */

void set_data(void *pBuff /* This is the local pBuff, which is being changed */)
{
    ...
    pBuff = phy_bn;
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
i wanted to just clear my concept..yes i can use vector or pass by reference..but i want to know why pBuff is not getting assigned –  user1825817 Nov 15 '12 at 17:17
    
@cSharper because you have both a local version and a global version, and so you're only changing the local version when you do your assignment. –  Xymostech Nov 15 '12 at 17:18
    
@cSharper because you are not passing by reference! –  Rook Nov 15 '12 at 17:19
    
@Xymostech now that is very helpful..thxx –  user1825817 Nov 15 '12 at 17:25
    
the only good ans..with no upvotes :0 –  user1825817 Nov 15 '12 at 17:36

Because it is a copy of the pointer being modified within set_data(). Pass the pointer by reference so the change is visible to the caller:

void set_data(void*& pBuff)

Note that the function variable pBuff hides the global variable pBuff in the function set_data().

That said, I am unsure of the reason for void* and why vector<int> is not being used which handles all dynamic memory allocation for you.

share|improve this answer
    
i wanted to just clear my concept..yes i can use vector or pass by reference..but i want to know why pBuff is not getting assigned –  user1825817 Nov 15 '12 at 17:16
    
+1 for mentioning the copy of the parameter on the stack –  πάντα ῥεῖ Nov 15 '12 at 17:24
    
thank you for ur valuable info –  user1825817 Nov 15 '12 at 17:28

'plz i want to avoid double pointers..its not required i guess...'

Guessed wrong, it is required! You'll need a pointer reference for the pBuff parameter then:

void set_data(void*& pBuff)
{
    // ...
}

This is effectively the same as using a double pointer.

The only thing you're doing with

pBuff =phy_bn; 

is manipulating the function parameter representation on the local stack.

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thank you for ur valuable info –  user1825817 Nov 15 '12 at 17:29

The pBuff inside set_data is not the global pBuff. The value of the global pBuff never gets changed from 0. Since this is C++ code, set_data can take its pointer argument by reference, and assigning to it will change the value at the point of the function call.

share|improve this answer
    
i wanted to just clear my concept..yes i can use vector or pass by reference..but i want to know why pBuff is not getting assigned –  user1825817 Nov 15 '12 at 17:16
    
thank you for ur valuable info –  user1825817 Nov 15 '12 at 17:32

In C++, pointers are passed by value, the same as other value types. It may be instructional to think of a pointer as literally an integer type; then it’s easy to see why pBuff = phy_bn; doesn’t accomplish anything, for the same reason that this code doesn’t:

#include <iostream>

void set(int x) {
    x = 5;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    int y = 0;
    set(y);
    std::cout << y << '\n';
    return 0;
}

Here, x is a local variable. It is a copy of y, not y itself. You can change its value by assigning to it, sure, but you’re merely changing the value of a variable which will not exist outside the scope of set(). If you change the definition of set() to use a reference:

void set(int& x) {
    x = 5;
}

Then y will indeed be updated, because you have explicitly requested that x be an alias for the name you pass to set(), instead of a copy. You were misled by the names: the pBuf in set_data() is not the same variable pBuf in main(), even though they happen to have the same value; they’re like two different people with the same name and the same amount of money.

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thank you for ur valuable info –  user1825817 Nov 15 '12 at 17:28

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